Inheritance

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Related to dominant inheritance: codominant inheritance

Inheritance

Any form of property that one receives when a person dies. One may receive an inheritance because the deceased person had so specified in a will, or, if there is no will, one may receive an inheritance simply by being a close relative of the deceased. In most countries, inheritances are taxed if they are valued over a certain amount. See also: Estate.

Inheritance

As distinguished from a bequest or devise, an inheritance is property acquired through laws of descent and distribution from a person who dies without leaving a will. Property so acquired usually takes as its basis, for gain or loss on later disposition or for depreciation, the fair market value at the date of the decedent's death. An inheritance of property is not a taxable event, but the income from an inheritance is taxable.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our finding supports that of other researchers (20, 21), who also found abnormality in the mode of autosomal dominant inheritance in their studies.
Thus, a monogenic dominant inheritance of resistance to Zn deficiency in common bean was indicated.
2) Autosomal dominant inheritance has been reported in approximately 30% of cases.
If receiving an abnormal gene from just one parent is enough to produce a disease in the child, the disease is said to have dominant inheritance.
The pedigree suggested that the gene causing their severe glaucoma followed a dominant inheritance pattern.
5] The apical HCM is frequently sporadic; however, a few families have been reported with autosomal dominant inheritance.
If no other primary cause for brain calcification is found or if the family history is suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance, molecular genetic testing should be considered.
It generally has an autosomal dominant inheritance, but autosomal recessive and X-linked dominant inheritance have also been reported (4, 6).
Male-to-male transmission in the family reported by Bloom and Abramowitz (1943) is consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance.
Marfan syndrome is a genetic connective tissue disorder with an incidence of roughly 1 in 5,000 and autosomal dominant inheritance, so the fetus of an affected mom has a 50% chance of having the disorder.
Autosomal dominant inheritance has rarely been reported with familial DCM.
Family history of multigenerational breast/ovarian cancers suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance.