dome

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Related to domes: DOMS, DOMEX, Geodesic domes, vaults

Dome

In technical analysis, a price trend indicated on a chart by a gradual rise to a high, followed by a gradual decline. Traders seek to sell at the top point of the dome. Generally speaking, the sell signal is reached when trading is characterized by low volume and flat prices. This is seen as a shift from bull market to a bear market, albeit a slow one. It is also called an inverted saucer. See also: Saucer.

dome

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dome
In technical analysis, a chart formation indicating a market top and characterized by an upside-down U-shaped pattern. A dome is an example of a reversal pattern. Also called inverted saucer, rounded top.
References in periodicals archive ?
"It is our first dome tour," leader Jihyo said during the concert on Wednesday.
County officials' proposal on Thursday also calls for setting up a shared-governance entity that would manage both the domes and the public museum.
"These dome rooms were completely unharmed," Konishi said.
With operations in Northern and Southern California and a distributor network of warehouses nationwide, TruncatedDomesDepot.com distributes a large array of compliant truncated domes products from top-line manufacturers.
Dome architecture in mosques of Malaysia uses reinforced-steel structure with cladding finishes.
ABC Domes is proceeding with structures at two Southern facilities in Georgia: Alvin W.
The dome will remain illuminated at night and partly visible through the scaffolding and paint-capturing cloths.
"The popularity of the Football and Golf Domes has exceeded all our expectations but I think that's down to the fact we have put together a great team there and the facilities are of such high quality, clean and in the best possible condition."
In previous studies we have examined a set of lunar domes with very low flank slopes which differ in several respects from the more commonly occurring lunar effusive domes.
The architects of Christian and Islamic domes drew from a common historical well of inspiration, as well as drawing inspiration more directly from each other.
According to Behrens, a bioenergy dome creates an "eternal spring" inside that dramatically increases the growth of duckweed, which is then burned in a special oven to produce electricity.