Divestiture

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Divestiture

A complete asset or investment disposal such as outright sale or liquidation.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Divestiture

The removal of assets from a person or firm's balance sheet through sale, exchange, closure, bankruptcy, or some other means. Divestiture may occur when a person or company has acquired more than he/she/it can properly administer. This sort of divestiture may occur slowly; for example, a corporation may slowly sell subsidiaries to concentrate exclusively on its core competence. On the other hand, divestiture may occur because a person or company has become cash poor and needs to build liquidity very quickly.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

divestiture

The sale, liquidation, or spinoff of a division or subsidiary. For example, a firm may decide to divest itself of a division in order to concentrate its managerial efforts on more promising segments of its business.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Firms with close bank ties face less pressure to make abrupt cuts in employees or engage in divesture restructuring because they are assured of funding, even given a poor performance (Hoshi/Kashyap 2001).
For example, pressures from non-profit-oriented stakeholders may generate reputation costs to the top managers, relating to the negative public opinion on asset divesture attempts.
After eliminating repeated articles, we found 130 unique reports related to asset divesture, 56 reports on downsizing and 577 unique reports related to asset expansion activities.
The first category is asset divesture, which is the count of sell-off, spin-off, plant closure (liquidation) and business withdrawal activities.
Using Toshiba Machine Co as an example, we identified reports that relate respectively to asset divesture, asset expansion and downsizing.
Our dependent variables have certain important characteristics: (1) they are non-negative; (2) they are integer-valued, denoting counts of asset divesture and asset expansion activities; (3) they exhibit overdispersion, with 93 percent of the values on asset divesture and 68 percent of the values on asset expansion equaling zero; and (4) they are longitudinal.
The results show that Japanese firms engaged in significantly fewer asset divesture restructuring and more asset expansion restructuring only after the implementation of the Corporate Restructuring Law.