disutility


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disutility

the dissatisfaction or pain that an individual encounters in consuming a product or in working. Compare UTILITY.
References in periodicals archive ?
At 70% cost coverage for the rehabilitation and para-clinical benefits, females had disutility (OR = 0.86), and males had some utility (OR = 1.04).
In a one-class system, people weigh 'the utility from salary, disutility from employment, and utility from future prospects to the same extent, as will do in a two-class society--encompassing, say, 'an overwhelming majority of the population (say, 99%) ...
In such cases, the disutility of animals being transported over long distances might be compensated by the additional utility obtained by faithful, who can produce their meat in the manner they prefer.
Disutility scores are different for each individual patient, and utilizing the mean disutility score can be misleading at the individual patient level for tailored pharmacotherapy [57, 58].
For instance, Figure 1(b) shows the disutility function: the time component for a user moving from A to B is represented as an example.
This assumption implies in particular that the disutility for low effort is relatively small (upper bounded by u[[W.sub.s](1 + [r.sub.0])]).
Routes are scheduled in such a way so that these result in least transportation cost and customer disutility. Transportation cost is derived from the number of vehicles used and the total distance traveled.
Since loss averse customers, to whom the disutility of a loss is greater than the utility of an equivalent gain, prudently consider the tradeoff between the perceived reference price from the previous prices and the current price when purchasing products, an unfavorable price is seen as a loss.
These new weights incorporate not only the volume of each event but also each indicator's associated harm to the patient (e.g., risk of mortality, risk of readmission) and the disutility (i.e., severity) associated with each individual harm.
In both cases, the content gives consumers a direct benefit while the ads or the financial counterpart is a source of disutility. We assume that consumers prefer freeness to ad-less contents so the marginal disutility caused by one more euro is greater than the disutility caused by one more unit of ad.
By 2060, 3.75 billion working days per year could be lost due to the adverse health effects of dirty air -- what economists call the "disutility of illness." The direct market impact of this pollution in terms of lower worker productivity, higher health spending, and lower crop yields, could exceed 1 percent of GDP, or $2.6 trillion, annually by 2060.