test

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Test

The event of a price movement that approaches a support level or a resistance level established earlier by the market. A test is passed if prices do not go below the support or resistance level, and the test is failed if prices go on to new lows or highs.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

test

The attempt by a stock price or a stock market average to break through a support level or a resistance level. For example, a stock that has declined to $20 on several occasions without moving lower may be expected to test this support level once again. Failing to fall below $20 one more time would be considered a successful test of the support level and a bullish sign for the stock.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
aureus isolates; of these, 42 were resistant to oxacillin by the disk diffusion test and one isolate was susceptible.
This shows that the oxacillin disk diffusion test alone could predict mecA gene in less number of isolates (202/241; 83.8%) compared to cefoxitin disk diffusion (216/241; 89.6%).
In the disk diffusion test, the zone of inhibition of both E.
Some ESBLs may fail to reach a level to be detectable by disk diffusion tests but result in treatment failure in the infected patient.
Since cefoxitin is a better inducer of mecA than oxacillin, a cefoxitin disk diffusion test will detect MRSA strains with better accuracy (4).
Disk diffusion test done is same as in enterobacteriaceae except that the plates should be incubated at 35 [+ or -] 2[degrees]C in ambient air for full 24 h.
The disk diffusion test was used to determine antimicrobial susceptibility.
pylori a disk diffusion test was performed at 2.5 mg/ml of test compounds using BD Sensi-Disks (Becton and Dickinson, Germany), placed on agar plates.
Of the erythromycin-resistant isolates, eight (32%) showed characteristics of inducible resistance by the disk diffusion test. Only 4 of the 46 isolates (8%) expressed constitutive resistance to clindamycin.
The other most commonly used methods to test pneumococci were the disk diffusion test (27.6%), MicroScan (23.2%), and PASCO (0.6%).
A disk diffusion test utilising both temocillin and piperacillin/ tazobactam (TPT) zone diameters has been suggested as a screen to aid detection of OXA-48 producers, but it may lack sensitivity in low prevalence areas such as New Zealand (9).