Disclosure

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Disclosure

A company's release of all information pertaining to the company's business activity, regardless of how that information may influence investors.

Disclosure

The voluntary or required release of information relevant to a security, company, fund, or anything else. In order to be listed on an exchange, a company must provide disclosure on itself by registering with the SEC and abiding by regulations that govern what information about itself that the company releases. Disclosure exists to prevent price manipulation and anything else that would disrupt the efficiency of trade. See also: Transparency.

disclosure

The submission of facts and details concerning a situation or business operation. In general, security exchanges and the SEC require firms to disclose to the investment community the facts concerning issues that will affect the firms' stock prices. Disclosure is also required when firms file for public offerings. See also full disclosure.

Disclosure.

A disclosure document explains how a financial product or offering works. It also details the terms to which you must agree in order to buy it or use it, and, in some cases, the risks you assume in making such a purchase.

For example, publicly traded companies must provide all available information that might influence your decision to invest in the stocks or bonds they issue. Mutual fund companies are required to disclose the risks and costs associated with buying shares in the fund.

Government regulatory agencies, such as the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), self-regulating organizations, state securities regulators, and NASD require such disclosures.

Similarly, federal and local governments require lenders to explain the costs of credit, and banks to explain the costs of opening and maintaining an account.

Despite the consumer benefits, disclosure information isn't always easily accessible. It may be expressed in confusing language, printed in tiny type, or so extensive that consumers choose to ignore it.

References in periodicals archive ?
At no time can a tax preparer disclose such information to an affiliated firm; disclosure must happen within the same firm.
Last year Fine Gael failed to disclose a single donation even though it took in EUR576,730.
Can the written permission be obtained through the use of an engagement letter that discloses the anticipated use of the external service provider?
The Court also made it clear that under section 206(2) the SEC may charge a violation even though it did not establish that a client was actually injured as a result of the failure to disclose, nor that the adviser intended to injure the client.
In their findings, the disciplinary panel said Ms Reilly admitted she had failed to disclose her relationship with the offender but had argued that she did not need to and that doing so would have breached data protection legislation.
The DISCLOSE Act requires organizations to also disclose the transfer of funds to other groups that are made for the purpose of campaign related expenditures.
Earlier, the court was told that the total strength of government officers in the country was 172,000 of which only 616 officers had volunteered to disclose information about their foreign nationality, whereas 147 of them had chosen not to reveal their own nationality and 291 the nationality of their spouses.
4638-U, dated 6 December 2017, 'On the Forms, Procedure and Timeframe for Credit Institutions to Disclose Information on Their Operations' that has been registered with the Ministry of Justice and becomes effective 10 days after its official publication.
The CMA has called on listed entities to disclose their IFRS transition progress in phases.
Then if person i is willing to disclose person j, then we assume that the waiting time for person j to become known is exponentially distributed with rate [xi] as a result, independent of whether person i is willing to disclose any other individuals.
Owens did not disclose his corporate affiliation in this article, despite having disclosed his P&G employment in a previous EHP article (Owens and Koeter 2003).