directional growth

directional growth

The direction in which a city or town seems to be growing. This is important in appraisal and in making decisions to purchase speculative real estate to hold for later sale or development.

References in periodicals archive ?
The directional growth of trees tells stories about wind patterns and weather predictions, just as the paths that deer follow when spooked tell of surrounding dangers, terrain, and animal behavior.
In order to obtain good performance, such as device effects and electrical conductivity, direct growth on metal substrates had also been reported [10-12], in which the highly oriented CNTs array was grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) or plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) [13]; the directional growth of CNTs was guided by the electric field bias of the plasma [14], but the growth effect was inferior to that of silicon substrate.
'We view the directional growth and expansion along the I-35 corridor as an opportunity to expand our footprint and as a precursor to entering the Austin market,' said Jim Goudge, chairman and CEO of Broadway Bank.
Second, in these interactions we characterized directional growth before and after colony interaction by using colony area and geometric center of mass.
symbiolongicarpus winners immediately responded to contact by directional growth of nematocyte-filled hyperplastic stolons toward competitors; these stolons, which often overgrew and destroyed the sparsely arranged stolonal network of P.
The directional growth observed in clonal replicates--and to some extent in sexually produced colonies--most likely represents opportunistic growth into unoccupied areas; that is, clonally produced P.
Your nurturing energy and ability to focus can produce constructive and directional growth. Sometimes you hold your emotions too much within you and can be stubborn and worrisome.
Clumped settlement of larvae or patchy mortality may also influence this dispersion pattern, but they are unlikely to be major contributors to the formation of dense aggregations compared with the very rapid rates of directional growth and fission we have documented.
Although mobility in sessile organisms is generally confined to a juvenile dispersive phase, many attached clonal animals and plants have a considerable capacity for dispersal through rapid directional growth or by the production of asexual propagules by fission, fragmentation, or gemmulation.
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