diffusion

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diffusion

the process whereby INNOVATIONS are accepted and used by firms and consumers through imitation, licensing agreements or sale of products and patents.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
But the real point lies elsewhere: it concerns the tacit equation of the "diffusionist type" with the "transmission of culture." Diffusionism is a crude, simplistic explanatory model; diffusion, as the transmission of cultural traits, is a reality.
In opposition to the "diffusionists," Cheetham and colleagues argue that even though there are differences between these complexes (especially in their unslipped pottery), more similarities unite them and these similarities are the precursors to the full blown Mamom tradition, which all scholars recognize as culturally Maya [4,7,60,61, 67].
She also mentions the popular German fantasy that the conquest of Poland was "a conquest by plowshare" according to the diffusionist model adopted by many German historians.
Diffusionist [diffusion of ideas versus a common realization by peoples
Diffusionist thinking went something like this: such aspects of civilisation like Ancient Egypt were rare and unique events which then spread out as other groups borrowed and copied them.
2011), belongs to a more old-fashioned diffusionist school.
The "processes Mechanical," a further punning allusion to the diffusionist ideas of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge and other propagandists for cultural change through the education of the working man, offered an ambiguous evaluation of the changes likely to be wrought by the march of intellect.
In an article dealing with this issue, I showed that Croatian ethnology, in spite of its alleged national(istic) bias, or maybe because it feared being accused of it, managed to navigate relatively freely in the multinational Yugoslav workers' state by examining individual items of peasant cultures within a diffusionist paradigm, irrespective of their "ethnic bearers." I argued that Croatian ethnology, at the time, promoted a culturalist and transnational rather than a national(ist) agenda (Capo 1991; for a summary Capo and Gulin Zrnic 2014).
(Casanova 11) What hap pens to our diffusionist and evolutionary schemes of cultural influence (and imposition) when we recognize the work of informal sectors in the formation and circulation (in, that is, the worlding) of the modern novel as the predominant form of literary expression in the world today?
World literature is, first and foremost, a spatial category, which can emerge in many ways, from the transatlantic diffusionist model deployed by Franco Moretti's cartographic methodologies to the construction of imagined territories, such as Casanova's "World Republic of Letters," where literature is ultimately a matter of center and periphery.