Diaspora

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Diaspora

The persons of a community living outside their area or ancestral homeland, especially but not necessarily as a community. A diaspora can create and sustain trade and other economic ties between two areas. For example, a businessman from one ethnic group may communicate with a relative in the homeland in order to set up an import-export company.
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Before critically examining the social and political connection between old and the new Diasporic African people in contemporary America, it is imperative to first trace back the historic nature of the connection between continental Africa and the African Diaspora.
Chapter two examines Lawrence Hill's The Book of Negroes and the power of narrating "black diasporic subjectivity into being" (98).
Looking at Vishniac, we need to summon a wary diasporic eye in order to see through our own needy nostalgia, and thus interrogate our desire to use Vishniac's images as a mode of chanting kaddish, despite the caution against viewing the powerful photos in A Vanished World through a mediating, backshadowing lens.
Andrews, himself a diasporic Englishman who not only buttressed the cause from Fiji, and persuaded the Mahatma-in-the-making to return to India to continue the struggle, but also brought the gospel of satyagraha to the southern Caribbean.
This narrative of development is then contrasted with theorizations of diasporic media and participatory media as they have applied to other communities.
The Caribbean diasporic writers that Machado Saez examines are, she claims, positioned at "the intersection of ethnic and world literatures, local and global histories, [and] multicultural and postcolonial discourses" (2), so that even as they struggle with the marketability of their ethnicity they also present a postcolonial ethics of historical revision.
As Sams argues, Irish works have on the whole been more readily absorbed in the British theatrical establishment, however the works of dramatists such as Mary O'Malley, Ron Hutchinson and Tom Murphy have directly engaged with the diasporic experience and presented complicated pictures of "intercultural hostilities and rejections" (35).
frames a diasporic feminist theology that resonates with her current location, and with her multiple sociopolitical locations within the global context.
While she foregrounds the critical importance of diasporic solidarity and the interactions that propagate it, she does so with the understanding that 'practicing solidarity is hard work [and] offers us an opportunity to consider pan-Africanism not so much as a movement that has or has not succeeded, but as a continuum of achievements and apparent failures that can only be understood in toto' (p.
Nibbs has made several contributions to the anthropological and refugee studies literature on important questions of refugee resettlement, by exploring relevant and inter-related issues that influence refugees' "belonging" in relation to their new larger society, their own local ethnic group, and their diasporic ethnic group members, which readers will find insightful.
Instead, it seems more fruitful and appropriate to illustrate these alliances, even filial and familial emergences, as "inheritances," specifically "diasporic inheritances" so that the manner by which African American men marry West African women (in some cases, to access a kind of lineage actuated by marriage and not solely devotional practice), or whereby even Anglo-American Muslims take on specific practices of the body that seek to recognize spiritual authority as such, might be framed in such a way that can adequately capture the multiple access points into a West African Sufi tradition.
India and the Diasporic Imagination is the admirable publication of papers presented at the international conference held in France at the Universite Paul Valery in April 2009, with all but three papers written in English.