devise

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devise

A transfer of real property by virtue of the provisions in a will. Contrast with descent, which is a transfer by virtue of statutory provisions controlling ownership of real estate when one dies without a will.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because it appeared that they could not be characterized as types of Christ, women presented some difficulties for pageant devisers (Chapter 6), and they responded to the challenge in a variety of ways.
Accountants, Auditors, Devisers of Business Systems" in a 1903 edition of the New York Accountants and Book-Keepers' Journal.
The devisers of the list with the lowest mileage will win ONE OF THREE PAIRS OF CANON BINOCULARS.
Taxing away bequests would cause devisers to alter their behavior and leave less wealth via wills.
Its devisers should take the chorus of disgruntled chunterings they have elicited from the crustier elements of London's art establishment as a genuine compliment.
It is - as the devisers of any British league need to remember - possible to have too much of a good thing.
The devisers of Snakes And Adders are hoping it will help drag Britain off the bottom rung of the world maths league table.
The "play" mode introduces the user to the creative mind of the devisers of Composer Quest.
In her first chapter, Frye ably demonstrates that The Queen's Majesty's Passage through the City of London to Westminster the Day before her Coronation, which Richard Mulcaster abstracted from pageants produced by four devisers including Richard Grafton, who worked under the auspices of the London aldermen, is not an unproblematic and objective document.
When we talked about the financial crunch, my old partner had a hard time understanding why it now took 10 physicians and 21 employees to support an army of health care regulators, claims re-pricers, pre-certitiers, concurrent reviewers, retrospective reviewers, quality assurance people, managed care sales reps, administrators, assistant administrators, peer reviewers, practice consultants, CPAs, corporate attorneys, headhunters, forms devisers, forms revisers, and computer programmers--all of whom now lay claim to a piece of the pie.
Based on massive archival research, both in the United States and Europe, it stands as a bona fide effort to write international history; and interpretively, it moves beyond the conception of an American response to European distress and Communist activity to show that the Marshall Plan was an international projection of American developments reaching back to the 1920s; that its devisers and implementers embraced a form of corporatist thinking that had influenced American public policy in the 1920s and 1930s; that its intentions were to refashion the political economy of Western Europe in the image of that in the United States; and that it sought "integration" for both economic and strategic reasons.