devise

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devise

A transfer of real property by virtue of the provisions in a will. Contrast with descent, which is a transfer by virtue of statutory provisions controlling ownership of real estate when one dies without a will.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of his mentors and partners were people like industrialist Henry Kaiser, animated-film icon Walt Disney, Lear jet inventor Bill Lear, and supertanker deviser D.K.
Or forget all your cares and drop by the Kiasma, Helsinki, Project Room from May 23 to August 26, where board-game deviser and anatomist of social role-playing Eva Grubinger will stage a new multimedia installation, Operation R.O.S.A., 2001, the video component of which features a voiceover by Nina Hagen.
Celui-ci l'abrite et prend occasion de deviser avec lui sur l'univers.
First, we justify the benefits of using a library of predesigned objects for this purpose both from the perspective of the user as a deviser of questionnaires and also from the perspective of the extra facilities which may be offered by a suitable software program.
D'Urfe plays here on the sense of autheur, who may also be "th'originall inventor, the first deviser, of a thing" (Cotgrave).
No slight is intended on BHB chairman Peter Savill, and there can be little doubt that he, as the deviser of the plan for racing's regeneration, must be the man whose mastery of the issues remains unrivalled.
In antiquity, Archimedes was best known as a deviser of ingenious machines.
Baseball has players and spectators and presents an unfolding action, but it has no playwright: the original deviser of the rules, the legendary Abner Doubleday, is hardly the ghost of a playwright.
And then indeed, Miletus, deviser of wicked deeds, you will become a feast and bright gifts to many, and your wives will wash the feet of many long-haired men, and others at Didyma will care for our temple.(4)
(31.) Works 265-6, `a man who does ill to another does ill to himself; ill counsel is most in for its deviser', seems to reverberate through the ending of the play (esp.
who was mortally shot at the siege of Westchester by the poet, actor and (in later years) deviser of Lord Mayor's shows, Thomas Jordan: