Reversal

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Reversal

Turn, unwind. For convertible reversal, selling a convertible and buying the underlying common, usually effected by an arbitrageur. For market reversal, change in direction in the stock or commodity futures markets, as charted by technical analysts in trading ranges. For options reversal, closing the positions of each aspect of an options spread or combination strategy.

Reversal

A change in a security's price trend.
References in periodicals archive ?
Te effect of training and detraining on several enzymes in horse skeletal muscle.
Inseason Resistance Training and Detraining in Professional Team Handball Players.
Therefore, the same measures were completed prior to EMST (baseline), post-EMST (or predetraining), and following the 3 mo of detraining (postdetraining).
13) Optimal performance will occur when physiological capacity is maximised as the negative influences of fatigue due to a heavy training load are reduced, but before detraining occurs.
The Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University in Ontario found that subjects (age 65 to 81) who trained over a two-year period for twice a week for an hour, performing two to three sets of both upper and lower body exercises at up to 80% of the heaviest weight they could lift once (1-RM) were still able to lift up to 24% above their baseline 1-RM after three years of detraining.
Hospital, and also the provision of refreshments to `stretcher bearers' engaged in detraining sick and wounded soldiers at Aintree station.
Though the effect of detraining is not well-documented in the research literature, a small body of evidence suggests that even short periods of inactivity may produce significant, but negative, alterations in physiological conditions and performance; that is, cause negative changes in maximum oxygen consumption (Max V[O.
Strength levels remained unaltered during the detraining because of positive hormonal changes in the men.
Effects of short-term resistance training and subsequent detraining on the electromechanical delay.
Strength adaptations and hormonal responses to resistance training and detraining in preadolescent males.