Determinism

(redirected from determinists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

Determinism

Fully ordained in advance. A deterministic chaos system is one that gives random looking results, even though the results are generated from a system of equations.

Determinism

In economics, the theory that occurrences are caused directly by other occurrences, and that economic agency by individuals plays little or no role. For example, a company's success occurs because social and economic pressures cause its products to be demanded, and not because of any marketing strategy its management devises. Determinism is associated with Karl Marx, who believed in the importance of historical analysis in explaining economic phenomena. However, some Marxist analysts have rejected that Marx taught economic determinism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Importantly, biological determinist approach conceptualizes sex-differentiated roles not only as 'naturally given' but also as largely unchangeable (Coltrane, 1994; Brandser, 1996).
The determinist position is that, in a universe governed by the strictest natural laws, all events arise naturally and inevitably from causative factors that follow these laws.
Taking all these things together, it becomes clear that the rescue of both academic and ecological integrity requires a reintegration of humanity into Nature, a reassembling of the pieces shattered by not just irresponsible corporations but by the intellectually irresponsible cultural determinists who are busy undermining the very thing that we need to save the earth: the discipline and independence of science, of free and fearless investigation unconstrained by aberrant political theories of no relevance, and the integration of evolutionary studies into the social sciences.
It is held by Harris, Daniel Dennett, (3) and many other contemporary determinists.
Hard determinists put forward two main arguments to the conclusion that the causal efficacy of our wills is insufficient to ground free will: (1) we are not the ultimate source of our wills, and (2) the operation of our wills is subject to causal laws that dictate only one possible outcome.
Yet it is important to test this hypothesis empirically, as this article will illustrate, in order to assess what social factors may influence individuals' beliefs in the biological determinist view.
A simpler answer to the determinist hypothesis lies in the role of the conscious observer, whose free choice of the means of observation turns what is merely probable into a physical state that is definite and measurable.
There is a lot of inconsistency in the comments of scholars, journalists, and public figures, but most claims about the force of technology can be sorted into one of two standard views: the determinist view and the instrumentalist view.
Today, determinists often speak as if the belief in open time is a relic of the prescientific past, but most Western theologians have insisted that time is closed, that one and only one event can happen at any given moment.
Therefore, it comes as no surprise that the same eugenics folklore, genetic determinist folklore, was the guiding principle in developing the modern science of genetics.
Freeman's conclusion was that Mead was too strongly influenced by her preconceptions brought about by her earlier training at the hands of the cultural determinists notably Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict and romantic views of South Seas love popularised by noted authors such as Melville, and academics such as Handy.
The technological determinists perspective is perhaps the most common.