derivative

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Derivative

A financial contract whose value is based on, or "derived" from, a traditional security (such as a stock or bond), an asset (such as a commodity), or a market index.

Derivative Security

Futures, forwards, options, and other securities except for regular stocks and bonds. The value of nearly all derivatives are based on an underlying asset, whether that is a stock, bond, currency, index, or something else entirely. Derivative securities may be traded on an exchange or over-the-counter. Derivatives are often traded as speculative investments or to reduce the risk of one's other positions. Prominent derivative exchanges include the Chicago Mercantile Exchange and Euronext LIFFE.

derivative

An asset that derives its value from another asset. For example, a call option on the stock of Coca-Cola is a derivative security that obtains value from the shares of Coca-Cola that can be purchased with the call option. Call options, put options, convertible bonds, futures contracts, and convertible preferred stock are examples of derivatives. A derivative can be either a risky or low-risk investment, depending upon the type of derivative and how it is used. See also underlying asset.

Derivative.

Derivatives are financial products, such as futures contracts, options, and mortgage-backed securities. Most of derivatives' value is based on the value of an underlying security, commodity, or other financial instrument.

For example, the changing value of a crude oil futures contract depends primarily on the upward or downward movement of oil prices.

An equity option's value is determined by the relationship between its strike price and the value of the underlying stock, the time until expiration, and the stock's volatility.

Certain investors, called hedgers, are interested in the underlying instrument. For example, a baking company might buy wheat futures to help estimate the cost of producing its bread in the months to come.

Other investors, called speculators, are concerned with the profit to be made by buying and selling the contract at the most opportune time. Listed derivatives are traded on organized exchanges or markets. Other derivatives are traded over-the-counter (OTC) and in private transactions.

derivative

a financial instrument such as an OPTION or SWAP whose value is derived from some other financial asset (for example, a STOCK or SHARE) or indices (for example, a price index for a commodity such as cocoa). Derivatives are traded on the FORWARD MARKETS and are used by businesses and dealers to ‘hedge’ against future movements in share, commodity etc. prices and by speculators seeking to secure windfall profits. See LONDON INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL FUTURES EXCHANGE (LIFFE), EUREX.

derivative

a financial instrument such as an OPTION or SWAP the value of which is derived from some other financial asset (for example, a STOCK or SHARE) or indices (for example, a price index for a commodity such as cocoa). Derivatives are traded on the FUTURES MARKETS and are used by businesses and dealers to ‘hedge’ against future movements in share, commodity, etc., prices and by speculators seeking to secure windfall profits. See LONDON INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL FUTURES EXCHANGE (LIFFE), STOCK EXCHANGE.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Critics of Conrad's first published story-and there are many-point not only to its oddness, but also to its literary derivativeness.
Ironically, this strategy of reduction leaves the anti-Jacobin novel susceptible to the same charge of derivativeness it identifies in radical fiction.
Louis Zukofsky, Lorine Niedecker, and George Oppen are allotted a mere six pages a piece, as compared to eighteen for Roethke, a poet whose reputation has steadily declined as the derivativeness of his long sequences has been more fully understood
A second feature is deliberate derivativeness expressed in the borrowing and recycling of previous literature and other cultural materials.
Worthy of inclusion among competent Indian poets of his generation, no doubt-for there were many of that mostly bygone time who embarrassed by their triteness, their derivativeness, their clumsy use of Indian English, their ignorance of musicality, their prosaic flatness.
This "signature" scene is thus also an intertextual mirror, reflecting both the autobiographical intention of the film and the derivativeness that David describes to his friend Ken Wild:
When a temperamental parallel clearly does operate, it sometimes sounds more like derivativeness than positive dialogicality, and this is not the only problem with Crawford's evaluations.
First, there is the derivativeness of work done in obedience to the father, as identified in Hall's comment.
The sonnet-sequence is like much of Wright's early output, in its conventionality of form and occasional derivativeness.
IF it's not too much of a contradiction to say so, San Diegan quintet Delta Spirit are highly original in their derivativeness, in the same way as The Bees or The Strokes.
WHILE HAROLD BLOOM FAMOUSLY LABELED THE AGRICULTURAL LABORER and poet John Clare a "Wordsworthian shadow," most critics have challenged the notion of Clare's derivativeness, arguing that his poems offer a new way of representing nature.