deregulate

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Deregulate

To reduce the amount of regulation over a market or economy. It may include reduced or eliminated requirements for reporting or filing statements with regulators. Deregulating may allow an organization to conduct more activities than it could before; for example, it may allow a bank to make more high risk investments. Deregulation is intended to increase efficiency in the market by letting the Invisible Hand guide the economy apart from government intervention. Opponents, however, argue that deregulation increases the likelihood of fraud and unfair practices such as insider trading. Many analysts agree that deregulation helps firms on solid financial footing and hurts those that are not.

deregulate

To reduce or eliminate control. One of the major forces in the financial markets in the 1970s and 1980s was the federal government's decision to deregulate interest rates. The commissions charged to investors on security trades were deregulated in 1975.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is an argument in regulatory economics that the major "price and entry" rules, which once dictated which private competitors were allowed into a market and under what conditions, offered a sort of low-hanging fruit for deregulators to pluck during the uniquely desperate policy conditions of the late 70s.
Even the European Commission - not exactly the deregulator's friend at the best of times - has recognised that the burden of regulation falls more heavily the smaller a firm is.
Gramm's record as a reckless deregulator has not affected his rating as a Republican economic expert.
In fact, it was the incumbent whom Reagan so resoundingly defeated, Jimmy Carter, who was actually the most effective deregulator, before or since.
After Bush eked out a narrow win over Richards, the new governor gave the company a fundamental component of its Texas strategy in one of his first appointments: Public Utility Commissioner Pat Wood, a deregulator's dream.
Another view argues that the chairman isn't the deregulator he's reputed to be--that in fact, he's made the government more intrusive.
deregulator was back in action, telling the Wall Street Journal on the
I signed on to the enterprise with the stipulation to Darman (also communicated to Gray) that I believed in and would enforce a tough-minded, intellectually rigorous, and analytically fair review of agency rulemaking, but that I would not be a mindless deregulator or a shill for industry.
Summers, then a deregulator, now wants tougher financial regulations.
With the head of a deregulator but a heart that goes out to the little guy, the Arizona Republican, in the words of Andrew Jay Schwartzman, president and CEO of the Media Access Project, "is not just a maverick, he's also a little bit eccentric." What's more, politics tends to be especially local on the sorts of issues the Commerce Committee faces.
Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.), hardly a raving deregulator, upbraided Kessler for his agency's recalcitrance.
In our last episode, you will recall, the incomparable deregulator Richard Pratt had done his dirty work and then quit in 1983.