Depression

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Depression

Period when excess aggregate supply overwhelms aggregate demand, resulting in falling prices, unemployment problems, and economic contraction.

Depression

A particularly long and/or deep recession. While there is no technical definition of a depression, conventionally it is defined as a period featuring severe declines in productivity and investment and particularly high unemployment. During the Great Depression, for example, GDP in the United States dropped 12% between 1929 and 1930 and a further 16% the following year. Likewise, unemployment rose to more than 25% nationwide and higher in some places.

Depression.

A depression is a severe and prolonged downturn in the economy. Prices fall, reducing purchasing power. There tends to be high unemployment, lower productivity, shrinking wages, and general economic pessimism.

Since the Great Depression following the stock market crash of 1929, the governments and central banks of industrialized countries have carefully monitored their economies. They adjust their economic policies to try to prevent another financial crisis of this magnitude.

depression

see BUSINESS CYCLE.

depression

a phase of the BUSINESS CYCLE characterized by a severe decline (slump) in the level of economic activity (ACTUAL GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT). Real output and INVESTMENT are at very low levels and there is a high rate of UNEMPLOYMENT. A depression is caused mainly by a fall in AGGREGATE DEMAND and can be reversed provided that the authorities evoke expansionary FISCAL POLICY and MONETARY POLICY. See DEFLATIONARY GAP, DEMAND MANAGEMENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
As previously emphasized, depressive syndromes have long been related to the experience of unresolvable (occupational) stress and understood within the framework of the interaction between the individual and his/her social environment.
Participants were diagnosed with depression (DEP) if they met the DSM-III-R criteria for major depressive disorder or if they had "depressive syndrome." (Subjects were classified as having depressive syndrome if they met all the criteria for major depressive disorder, except that the depression could have been caused by alcohol or other drug use or another illness.) Participants with both ALC and DEP were included in the phenotype "alcoholism and depression" (AAD).
Depressive syndrome characterized by at least four of the following:
(12.) Nakaya M, komahashi T, Ohmori K, Suwa H.: The composition of the depressive syndrome in Acute Schizophrenia: Schizohrenia Research 1998 nov 30; 34 (3):151-7.
In multivariate analyses, higher body mass index and current receipt of depression treatment significantly increased the risk of having any depressive syndrome, but this risk was not increased within any category of glucose tolerance.
Studies show that from 6% to 10% of all patients visiting primary care practitioners for any reason have a major depressive syndrome,[1] and up to 30% of all primary care patients have depressive symptoms.[2] However, despite its high prevalence, primary care physicians fail to diagnose major depressive syndrome in their patients up to 50% of the time.[3]
The prevalence of depression was even higher (74%) in those who had daily headache.[3] The authors emphasize the need to give strong consideration to depression in the differential diagnosis of chronic headache; they also point out that some headache treatments may mask or aggravate the depressive syndrome. This study was small, and the findings may not be applicable to all headache patients seen in family practice.
That is the reason why it is assumed that magnesium treatments could be beneficial to almost all depressive syndromes. (21) Even if a few experimental and clinical studies were made, the results showed a relationship between magnesium and depression and/or anxiety, but not specifically between the magnesium intake and the incidence of these disorders.
Sleep disorders, hallucinations and depressive syndromes are common.
His works can be considered one of the main representatives of the idea that the depressive syndromes associated with stroke may not be "true" depressions, but a completely different category from Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) that would be associated with the patients' adjustment to changes in their living conditions (14).
These losses, in turn, may result in more distress and greater depressive syndromes," he noted.