Depression


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Depression

Period when excess aggregate supply overwhelms aggregate demand, resulting in falling prices, unemployment problems, and economic contraction.

Depression

A particularly long and/or deep recession. While there is no technical definition of a depression, conventionally it is defined as a period featuring severe declines in productivity and investment and particularly high unemployment. During the Great Depression, for example, GDP in the United States dropped 12% between 1929 and 1930 and a further 16% the following year. Likewise, unemployment rose to more than 25% nationwide and higher in some places.

Depression.

A depression is a severe and prolonged downturn in the economy. Prices fall, reducing purchasing power. There tends to be high unemployment, lower productivity, shrinking wages, and general economic pessimism.

Since the Great Depression following the stock market crash of 1929, the governments and central banks of industrialized countries have carefully monitored their economies. They adjust their economic policies to try to prevent another financial crisis of this magnitude.

depression

see BUSINESS CYCLE.

depression

a phase of the BUSINESS CYCLE characterized by a severe decline (slump) in the level of economic activity (ACTUAL GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT). Real output and INVESTMENT are at very low levels and there is a high rate of UNEMPLOYMENT. A depression is caused mainly by a fall in AGGREGATE DEMAND and can be reversed provided that the authorities evoke expansionary FISCAL POLICY and MONETARY POLICY. See DEFLATIONARY GAP, DEMAND MANAGEMENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table-II: Associations of study participants with depression (n= 450).
The prevalence of depression among women seeking antenatal care during their last trimester according to Goldberg Depression Scale was 40.89% (n=184) (Fig.1).
An empirical study conducted in Karachi reported 33% of prevalence of depression which was double in females than males which was 15.7%11,5.
One reason for this effect could be that post-natal depression in fathers is sometimes linked with an increased level of maternal depression, researchers concluded.
Is there any difference between the sample and population in the frequency of depression among infertile women?
It is estimated that 15% to 40% of all brain tumour patients suffer from depression, with highest rates among those with glioma.5 A systematic review based on 42 observational studies with 25 distinct self-reported diagnostic tools (scales) reported the prevalence of depression in glioma patients may range from 0 to 93% with a median prevalence of 27%.6 Another prospective cohort study with the largest sample size to date (n=155) reported that 20% of all glioma patients become clinically depressed within 8 months of diagnosis.7
A team at the University of Alabama at Birmingham conducted this study to measure changes in depression rate and severity during the first 12 months of antiretroviral therapy and to identify factors linked to depression after 12 months of therapy.
Also disturbing is the fact that teens suffering from depression don't appear to be seeking help from their primary care providers to relieve that depression, with the rate stagnating at about 10 percent for the last decade (Bagley, 2016).
Conclusion: High frequency of depression was found among elderly community and diversity exists in predicting factors.
Results: Main result showed that the prevalence of depression among ER Physicians was 47%.
The findings suggest that "more efforts should be made to improve screening and referral, particularly in light of the mounting evidence that early paternal depression may have substantial emotional, behavioral, and developmental effects on children," noted lead author James F.