depressed

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depressed

Of or relating to a security, product, or market in which demand is weak and price continues to decline.
References in periodicals archive ?
3 : to lessen the activity or strength of <Bad weather had depressed sales.>
Of those, 41 per cent said they read to their child at least three times a week, as compared with 58 per cent of fathers who weren't depressed.
The former pupil of Ysgol y Strade and Ysgol Gyfun Gwyr, who lived at Heol Morlais, Hendy, had become depressed when he injured his leg playing rugby, and was on medication for depression.
We analyzed 90 patients with depressed skull fracture managed surgically from January 2015 to December 2016.
Results: In this study the majority of the mothers booked for antenatal care 84% but only one third 26% had proper information about breast feeding both in depressed and non-depressed mothers.
Comparing three generations, the authors reported that grandchildren with both depressed parent and depressed grandparent had three times the risk of MDD.
On the basis of their two PHQ-9 scores, all patients were classified into one of four groups: The "nondepressed" group of 3,286 patients had a score of 9 or less on both occasions; the "remained depressed" cohort of 1,987 patients scored 10 or more on both PHQ-9s; the "no longer depressed" group of 1,542 patients scored at least 10 but subsequently improved by at least 5 points to a score of 9 or less; and the 735 patients in the "became depressed" group first scored 9 or less on the PHQ-9 but subsequently had at least a 5-point increase to a score of 10 or more.
"People with depression or even healthy people with a depressed mood can be affected by depressive thoughts," explained Center for BrainHealth principal investigator Bart Rypma, Ph.D., who also holds the Meadows Foundation Chair at UT Dallas.
For women aged 20-39, 45% of those who were depressed were obese, compared with 30% of nondepressed women.
Imagine if the depressed woman quoted above never got the opportunity to volunteer; imagine how different her life would be.
About 24 percent of participants in this age group reported being depressed over the 12-year period covered by the study, and medical data suggested that 177 had suffered first-time strokes.
Sharma, former head of forensic sciences department at AIIMS, said that if a person lying on bed is hit on his skull with a golf stick from behind, depressed fracture or cracked wound would be inflicted.