depreciable


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depreciable

Of, relating to, or being a long-term tangible asset that is subject to depreciation.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, if a taxpayer initially acquires a depreciable interest in 50% of an asset and subsequently acquires an additional depreciable interest in the same property, the proposed regulations provide that the additional depreciable interest is not treated as being previously used by the taxpayer.
If practicable, a taxpayer must use its records to determine the removed component's unadjusted depreciable basis (which is then used to determine the adjusted depreciable basis).
Since the replacement property (Vineyard B) has depreciable property that equals or exceeds the relinquished property (Vineyard B), no [section]1245 depreciation recapture is triggered.
Under the modified accelerated cost recovery system (MACRS), depreciable nonresidential real property placed into service after May 12, 1993, is generally subject to a 39year cost recovery period, using the straight-line method and midmonth convention [IRC section 168(c)].
It organizes depreciable hospital assets into nine tables according to common general ledger categories, then lists the assets in alphabetical order with their estimated useful lives and the number of the table in which they are located.
IREM strongly supports efforts to more accurately measure the depreciable life of buildings and to conform amortization periods of tenant improvements more closely to the term of the lease.
The capitalized amount can be treated as a separate depreciable asset in the same, corresponding MACRS class.
Respectfully, I would suggest that you use Kelley's Blue Book or some other authoritative source for gathering information on vehicle fair market value, especially since vehicles are highly depreciable assets.
The basis of a depreciable asset is reduced by the amount of the residual value to arrive at the depreciable amount.
In depreciating business real estate it is to the taxpayer's advantage to set the value of the land as low as possible and the value of the depreciable improvements as high as possible.
Whether a subscription list is a depreciable asset may seem an arcane subject to those who labor in the news, advertising and production departments, but this is an issue that goes to the heart of newspaper economics.
For example, consider the situation in which a taxpayer has a capital contribution and must determine whether receipt requires the taxpayer to recognize gross income, which creates basis in a depreciable asset, or whether the taxpayer does not have gross income and has no basis in a depreciable asset.