deflation

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Deflation

Decline in the prices of goods and services. Antithesis of inflation.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Deflation

A situation in which a currency gains value, often resulting from a decrease in prices. Many economists believe that deflation is the result a fall in demand for goods and services, which causes producers to reduce prices. This reduces their profits and causes a reduction in investment, which contributes to a further drop in demand. Because of this deflationary spiral, deflation is often associated with recessions and depressions and has been known to cause unemployment. It is also called negative inflation. See also: Lost Decade, Inflation.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

deflation

A reduction in consumer or wholesale prices. The term generally applies to more than just a temporary decline. Compare inflation. See also disinflation.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

Deflation.

Deflation, the opposite of inflation, is a gradual drop in the cost of goods and services, usually caused by a surplus of goods and a shortage of cash.

Although deflation seems to increase your buying power in its early stages, it is generally considered a negative economic trend. That's because it is typically accompanied by rising unemployment, falling production, and limited investment.

Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

deflation

a fall in the rate of growth of the general level of prices in an economy, or an absolute reduction in the general level of prices (see PRICE INDEX). The authorities may seek to deflate the economy in order to combat INFLATION and eliminate a BALANCE OF PAYMENTS deficit by using restrictive monetary and fiscal measures, i.e. increasing interest rates and taxes to cut spending. See ECONOMIC POLICY, MONETARY POLICY, FISCAL POLICY, PRICES AND INCOMES POLICY.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

deflation

a reduction in the level of NATIONAL INCOME and output usually accompanied by a fall in the general price level (DISINFLATION).

A deflation is often deliberately brought about by the authorities in order to reduce INFLATION and to improve the BALANCE OF PAYMENTS by reducing import demand. Instruments of deflationary policy include fiscal measures (e.g. tax increases) and monetary measures (e.g. high interest rates). See MONETARY POLICY, FISCAL POLICY.

Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, Hart's theory of law is consistent with nearly any theory of legal truth: including coherence, correspondence, warranted assertibility, and deflationist. Since Hart never spoke to the issue of his views of legal truth, and his theory of legal validity is consistent with many theories of legal truth, pinning the correspondence theory on him is unjustified.
Field, Hartry 1994: "Deflationist Views of Meaning and Content".
The second problem has led deflationists, including McGrath, to play the derivation game: show that the important generalizations about truth can be explained by deriving them from deflationary premises (the deflationary truth theory, supplemented where necessary by "unproblematic assumptions").
be invoked by a deflationist in formulating deflationism or in
This essay defends an account of truth that draws from both correspondence and deflationist theories.
First, it criticizes recent "minimal," sui generis demonstrative and deflationist theories for postulating eccentric or anomalous facts concerning the ways in which noun phrases contribute to truth conditions, or concerning the semantics of demonstratives or general syntax.
Charles Travis (1996) identifies the deflationist position on the truth of utterances with the principle that a true utterance is one that expresses a true proposition (p.
There is a deflationist position on what truth is: the notion is exhausted by a given, specified, mass of "platitudes", each to the effect that if words said (say) things to be thus, things must be that way.
(This may involve disallowing as illegitimate certain uses of truth conditional talk that an advocate of the Frege--Russell view would allow.)(3) Such a view might naturally be called a deflationist view of meaning and content; or more accurately, a deflationist view of meaning that and having the content that, or a deflationist view about the role of truth conditions in meaning or content.
It is argued that it avoids the pitfalls of earlier deflationist views such as Horwich's minimalist theory of truth and Field's version of deflationism.
In a recent article Gideon Rosen (1990 proposes a promising new deflationist interpretation of the possible worlds framework everyone is now so familiar with.
It then goes on to apply that distinction to the necessary a posteriori, and defend the deflationist view.