deficiency

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Related to deficiency disease: hereditary disease, scurvy

Deficiency

The amount by which a project's cash flow is not adequate to meet debt service.

Deficiency

1. The amount by which cash flow falls short of debt service. For example, if a company has $300,000 in current liabilities and only $250,000 in cash flow for a given year, its deficiency is $50,000.

2. In taxation, the amount by which one's tax liability exceeds what the individual person or organization reported. For example, if the IRS disallows certain deductions that the taxpayer applied, he/she will owe more in taxes than he/she reported on the return. Deficiency is the amount this taxpayer still owes to the IRS.

deficiency

1. The amount by which an individual's or an organization's tax liability as computed by the Internal Revenue Service exceeds the tax liability reported by the taxpayer.
2. The amount by which a firm's liabilities exceed assets.

deficiency

The amount due on a mortgage loan after adding all expenses of foreclosure and accrued interest to the principal balance of the loan and then deducting the sale price or lender-bid price for the property. The balance remaining, if any, may be collected by the lender by means of taking a deficiency judgment, unless prohibited by law or contract. Deficiency judgments may be collected just like any other judgment, through seizure of other assets or garnishment. There are two circumstances when a lender may not collect any deficiency:

1. In states with consumer protection statutes that outlaw deficiencies on first mortgages on a borrower's principal residence.

2. With mortgage loans designated as nonrecourse, meaning the lender and borrower agreed in advance that the property would stand for the debt and there would be no deficiency allowed in the event of foreclosure.

References in periodicals archive ?
As Turshen suggests, "the clinical model does not encompass the social relations of the individuals it studies, even at its most progressive limits." (23) Because poverty and hunger were manifest as nutritional deficiency diseases in Newfoundland, a medical paradigm was used.
While the first half of the century was devoted to preventing and controlling nutritional deficiency disease, the focus of the second half has been on preventing chronic disease with initiation of the Framingham Heart Study in 1949.
They range from culturally accepted neglect of women and children to wrong perspectives on development, most of which are easily avoidable." The document identified the contributory factors as follows: "poverty, high levels of population growth, rapid urbanisation, inadequate social support, poor quality of information and travel systems, lack of opportunities in rural areas, and infectious and deficiency diseases." What is striking is the close resemblance of the description to the one in the Bhore Committee Report.
In his 1943 book The Common Form of Niacin Amide Deficiency Disease: Aniacinamidosis, Kaufman listed symptoms of niacinamide deficiency: memory impairment, distractibility, poor concentration, slowed thought processes, poor comprehension, unwarranted anxiety, and personality changes (e.g., inability to cooperate, evasiveness, irritability, intolerance).
Another big benefit of vitamin C is that it helps the body digest and absorb iron that is a very essential mineral for the body.From all the above, we conclude how important vitamin C is for our health and wellbeing; and as it is a water-soluble vitamin, then, it cannot be stored in the body, so we should be careful to include its sources in our daily diets to prevent its deficiency, leading to the deficiency disease known as scurvy.
Following introductory chapters on vitamins' nutritional properties and intestinal absorption, he devotes a chapter to each vitamin, covering its absorption, analysis, bioavailability, conservation, deficiency disease, dietary sources, metabolism, stability, storage, chemical structure, and synthesis by gut flora.
They suggested that the pharmaceutical industry, doctors and researchers 'colluded' to promote the view that the menopause was a 'deficiency disease' and women needed long-term HRT to 'prevent illness, loss of sexuality and ugly ageing'.
"This will give them the potential to save the life of someone suffering from leukaemia or a severe immune deficiency disease through giving bone marrow."
Nutrition support claims can describe a link between a nutrient and the deficiency disease that can result if the nutrient is lacking in the diet.
Anemia, another deficiency disease, was treated around the 4th century B.C.
He was probably the first to have a clear conception of beriberi as a deficiency disease and to attempt to isolate the protective and curative component from foods.
Recalling that Whipple had found liver to be helpful in treating ordinary anemia (see 1920) and believing that pernicious anemia might be a dietary deficiency disease caused by the lack of some essential vitamin, Minot wondered if this vitamin might be found in liver.