informed consent

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informed consent

Consent given after being provided with fair and full disclosure of all the facts necessary to make an intelligent decision after weighing the relative pros and cons of the situation and the possibility of realistic alternatives.Real estate agents may sometimes represent both buyers and sellers in the same transaction if all parties agree after informed consent.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(12,16,27-30,32,34-36,38,40,42-46) Twelve studies evaluated the impact of tort reform on defensive medicine by assessing health care utilization (20,22,23-25,26,28,37,38,47,49,51,52) of which two (17 percent) used a difference-in-differences specification.
In addition to education and collaboration among disciplines, efforts to reduce thyroid cancer overdiagnosis should include tort reform, specifically reforms that diminish the incentive of physicians to practice defensive medicine. Until then, fear of litigation will continue to push physicians, particularly those practicing in high-risk climates, to continue to overdiagnose thyroid cancer.
The bigger problem is that defensive medicine is ugly, artless, and intellectually unsatisfying.
Physician study: Quantifying the cost of defensive medicine. Jackson Healthcare website.
A more recent report continues to emphasize the high cost of defensive medicine. (9) Jackson Healthcare invited 138,686 physicians to participate in a confidential online survey to quantify the costs and impact of defensive medicine.
Proponents of constraints to medical malpractice liability claim that (i) the tort system cannot establish the suitable criteria of care; (ii) the tort system is not satisfactorily regulated to identifying medical errors; and (iii) the system is expensive to put into operation due to significant administrative expenses and as liability leads to defensive medicine. Thus, medical malpractice litigation might be unsystematic, overpriced, unsuccessful, and overdeterring: damage limitations may enhance social welfare (Popescu, Comanescu, and Sabie, 2016) by decreasing the litigation proportion and boosting certainty in damages.
"The bottom line is defensive medicine is a huge and growing cost to all Americans," he said.
According to a recent surveys, (7) the cost of defensive medicine is estimated to be in the $650-$850 billion range, or between 26 and 34 percent of annual healthcare costs in the U.S.
Everyone agrees that defensive medicine is widely practiced.
Now, any attempts to loosen the rule will be seen as trying to practice defensive medicine.
* And, if protected from medical liability, a majority of physician leaders believe they could save money for patients without compromising their quality and safety--a move that could help curtail the practice of defensive medicine.