Deductive reasoning

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Related to deductive: Deductive argument, Deductive method

Deductive reasoning

Using known facts to draw a conclusion about a specific situation.
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If epistemology is to guide an interactionist treatment of deductive and inductive pedagogy, however, it must first provide the epistemological equivalents of these learning approaches, and then show how they may interact.
Here, the author, a full professor of strength of materials and engineering at the University of Cagliari, Italy, approaches the work-hardening problem in a new and deductive way.
Digraph analysis has a wide set of applications as a deductive tool, especially in the social sciences, where points often stand for individuals and arcs for relationships between them.
There is plenty of helpful advice (such as strategies and discussions of various aspects of symmetry and deductive reasoning), although some aspects are more dense and complex, and less immediately appealing to me as a primary school teacher.
We understand the importance of building and reinforcing investigative skills, communication abilities, and deductive reasoning.
So popular was this deductive genius of a sleuth that stories continued to be published by fans and admirers long after the death of Doyle.
If deductive inference abstracts directly from data, while inductive inference is based on but extrapolates partially beyond data, abductive inference extrapolates still further (p.
Editorial will cover such topics as deductive databases, data integration and exchange, data mining, database design and tuning, storage, data models and data cleaning and information extraction.
Linear recursion is the most frequently found type of recursion in deductive databases.
Updates requirements for contracting for construction; and relocates to PGI, procedures for distribution and use of contractor performance reports, handling of government estimates of construction costs, use of bid schedules with additive or deductive items, and establishment of technical working agreements with foreign governments.
This year, Jack Minker, professor emeritus of the University of Maryland, is being honored for his fundamental contributions to the fields of deductive databases, logic programming, artificial intelligence, and, more generally, logic-based methods in computer science and for his truly unprecedented role in organizing and stimulating scientific discourse.