debtor


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to debtor: Judgment debtor

Debtor

Debtor

A person, company, or other organization that owes money to another individual, company, or organization. Generally speaking, a debtor acquires debt for a specific purpose, such as to fund a college education or to purchase a house. In business and government, debt is often issued in the form of bonds, which are tradeable securities entitling the bearer to repayment at the appropriate time(s), making the issuing government or business the debtor. A debtor almost always compensates a creditor with a certain amount of interest, representing the time value of money. However, some areas of finance, especially Islamic banking, do not allow debt with interest.

debtor

An individual or organization that owes a debt or has an obligation to another party. Compare creditor.

debtor

a person or business that owes money to individuals or firms for goods, services or raw materials that they have bought but for which they have not yet paid (trade debtors) or because they have borrowed money Debtors are also termed ‘accounts receivable’.

See CREDITORS, DEBT, CREDIT CONTROL, WORKING CAPITAL, BAD DEBT.

debtor

(1) One who owes a debt.(2) In bankruptcy,the person who requests protection under the bankruptcy laws.

References in periodicals archive ?
325) the court implied that restraining notices are completely ineffective against senior secured parties, where there is no valuable debtor equity in the collateral.
In case of the decision on limiting the debtor's rights on the property disposition the bodies of investigation and inquiries also make records without the consent of the debtor.
You can ask the court to order the debtor to attend court to provide information about their current finances.
significant figures considering each debtor earned an average annual
A writ of garnishment also may be used to recover tangible or intangible personal property of the judgment debtor in the possession of another.
The society pointed to an international agreement that prevents imprisonment of such debtors.
It also sets out specific business practices which the OFT considers to be unfair or improper, such as using Facebook and Twitter and other social networking sites to contact debtors, as well as contacting debtors at unreasonable times, or at inappropriate locations, for example when they are a patient in hospital.
At each stage of the process it's important to take some time to consider whether or not your debtor has the money to pay.
Upon signing the payment agreement, National Union could have had no illusions that VP Debtors, as an operating debtor-in-possession, had a short life expectancy; and should have known that workers' comp claims would extend well beyond the life span of VP Debtors itself.
The creditor is the individual or organisation who is owed money by a debtor.
The ruling stipulates that if the debtor has no stable residency, moveable assets can be seized.