Debasement

(redirected from debased)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Debasement

The act of lowering the value of something, especially a coin. In the past, a government would melt coins down and mix them with a metal of lower value in order to create more coins of the same denomination. This inevitably caused inflation, though it is unclear how well these governments understood that. Because few currencies are now based on a precious metal, debasement it rare.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Another problem flows from the first: Commercial activity that for the most part makes up both public and private wealth is slowed down by a debased coinage.
"I had no one following me until I met Superman," Kaley, 28, told (Kaley Cuoco has once again debased the reports of marriage troubles with husband Ryan Sweeting.
Campbell - who called the corporation "debased beyond belief" in 2003 over their reporting of the Government's case for war in Iraq - will read extracts for a BBC2 series.
This militant stance was stymied by a male political culture that debased female reform and sought to prevent black "dependence" on the federal government.
Clearly, concluded Jackson, "somebody is guilty of taking steroids." Which is to say that Bonds' career stats were debased by his inflated physique.
Harper screamed about the importance of Parliament in his opposition years and it would be hard to find examples of any Prime Minister who has debased Parliament so quickly and so gleefully.
They're a machine that manufactures carnage--they kill, maim, burn, bomb, and destroy at the command of debased, corrupted politicians like Bush 2, Kerry, Clinton, and Bush 1.
So, granted, Washington is corrupt and debased, and it's entirely possible that political leaders will be distracted by some new scandal or foreign misadventure.
In the present era of debased cultural norms, it is of the utmost pastoral concern that the generality of Catholic become undeceived about the way their actions in time affect their prospects in eternity.
When being advertised in future, such a show should warn people that it will be offensive and contain debased language A.
Stephen Earley, who says that it is empowering the Rwandan women who had been so debased. People, he said, should see the calendar before making a judgment.
"The artists' use of debased signs and symbols, and their embrace of raw subjects from everyday life," he wrote, "shock and disorient the viewer into another state of mind." According to Artweek critic Lance Carlson (Mar.