Bell

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Bell

Signal on a stock exchange to indicate the open and close of trading.

Bell

A traditional bell that is rung to signify the beginning or the end of a trading day. The bell on the New York Stock Exchange is one of the more famous examples. As an increasing number of securities exchanges do most or all of their trading online, a bell has become a symbol or informal term for the beginning or the end of a trading day, rather than a description of a real bell.

bell

The device that sounds to mark the open and close of each trading day on an organized securities exchange.
References in periodicals archive ?
THE prison closure is the final death knell for Peterhead, where 1000 jobs have been axed in three years.
THE death knell is sounding for the out-of-town shopping centre, according to research by property consultants CB Hillier Parker.
The measures not only signal Washington's displeasure with the way the nation's synfuels development program has been managed, but also sound what could be a death knell for large synfuels projects in the United States.
What the bureaucrats haven't realised is that grabbing farming land could well sound the death knell to farmers' survival.
THE death knell has been sounded for old-style Army barracks dormitory familiar to generations of servicemen.
Now some enthusiasts fear the mite could sound the death knell for Scotland's 6000 beekeepers.
But it's not the death knell for hyperbaric oxygen.
THE 1,500 innocent people wrongly branded criminals should sound the death knell for our incompetent Home Office.
Mr Ford says the response effectively sounds the death knell for any form of transfer fee system and scuppers efforts to modify it to bring in a compensation package for clubs losing young players.
Around 100 noisy protesters gathered outside the City Chambers as councillors sounded the death knell for the schools yesterday.
THE 2,700 innocent people wrongly branded criminals should sound the death knell for our incompetent Home Office.
But Fyfe, whose men beat Swansea to become the first Scottish side to record two victories in the Heineken European Cup, fears the idea could sound the death knell for the club scene.