corner

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Corner a Market

1. To own a significant enough amount of a stock to be able to manipulate its price. More specifically, an investor corners a market when he/she owns so many shares in a company that he/she can trigger a sell off if he/she dumps the stock. For this reason, persons and institutions owning or buying more than a certain percentage of shares in a company must register with the SEC and are subject to certain restrictions.

2. To have the greatest market share in a particular industry without having a monopoly. Companies that have cornered their markets usually have greater leeway in their decisions; for example, they may charge higher prices for their products without fear of losing too much business. Large companies, such as Wal-Mart or Microsoft, are considered to have cornered their markets. See also: Gorilla.

corner

Significant control over a sufficient portion of a particular security so that it is possible to control the security's price. Others wishing to purchase the security, especially to cover short positions, are forced to buy it at an artificially high price. Corners were popular in the early 1900s when the securities markets were virtually unregulated. See also natural corner.

corner

To acquire a big enough position in a particular security or commodity so that control over its price and supply is achieved.

corner

vb. to buy or attempt to buy up all the supplies of a particular product on the MARKET, thereby creating a temporary MONOPOLY situation with the aim of exploiting the market.
References in periodicals archive ?
To cut corners last year, Michael Butler--a grower from Osceola, Ark.--canceled his subscription to DTN's satellite information service.
These results, along with anecdotal evidence, leads McCabe to conclude that while the Internet is clearly a convenient tool for students already looking to cut corners, it is not necessarily fostering great numbers of "new" cheaters.
"I don't want to cut corners based on what the Dow is doing any particular month," said Nichol.
Meghan Herlihy, 18, of New Canaan, Connecticut, cut corners on the clothes.
Touching on a supplementary budget for fiscal 2000, Kamei told reporters at the LDP's headquarters, ''Now is not the time to cut corners. We want a budget that will draw out and underpin private demand.''
Maybe he cut corners in cutting out the competition.
A final point: If you don't cut corners in your recruiting, if you don't bring in losers to play for you, if you don't monkey with the eligibility rules, if you don't allow just anybody to help you recruit, if you keep your players out of bars, and if You keep a close check on their associations...
Other departments also had costs higher than industry benchmarks, but the professional staff and board had agreed not to "cut corners like some for-profits."
Just because Americans don't purchase their own health insurance directly doesn't mean there's "market failure." And just because employers are costconscious doesn't mean they have an incentive to cut corners on their health plan.
He advised that those who review or audit financial statements "cannot be complacent or cut corners. We must be skeptical, scrutinize, ask questions and hold people accountable.
Her staff cut corners to accommodate plaintiff's absences.
Renewed and reinvigorated We Cut Corners are poised to release Imposters in early October.