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Currency

Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Currency

Money generally accepted in circulation in a certain jurisdiction. That is, currency is any form of money that businesses in a certain jurisdiction will accept in exchange for goods and services. Usually, the domestic government sets its own currency and provides penalties to persons and businesses in its jurisdiction that do not accept it. However, some countries (especially those experiencing hyperinflation) accept other countries' currencies informally. Alternatively, a country may use the currency of another (as some countries have done with the U.S. dollar) or pool resources to make an international currency accepted in several countries (the euro being the most prominent example). See also: Foreign exchange.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

currency

or

cash

the coins and bank notes which constitute the physical component of a country's MONEY SUPPLY, i.e. coins and notes have a physical identity, whereas the other assets comprising the money supply such as bank deposits, are book-keeping entries and have no tangible life of their own. See LEGAL TENDER, FOREIGN CURRENCY.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

currency

the BANK NOTES and coins issued by the monetary authorities that form part of an economy's MONEY SUPPLY. The term currency’ is often used interchangeably with the term cash in economic analysis and monetary policy.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Common examples of virtual currencies are crypto currencies such as Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ethereum.
The third category in the money tree differentiates between digital currencies that are exchanged for cash at a fixed rate (i.e one-for-one) and those that are exchanged at a variable rate.
Studies show that inflation has been significantly lower in economies with full currency substitution than nations with domestic currencies. The expected benefit of currency substitution is the elimination of the risk of exchange rate fluctuations.
currencies are not backed by any commodity but by the ability of their holder to exchange them for goods.
The book delves deeper into workings of crypto currencies, the future of crypto currency, how secure they are, the practical use of Money Trade Coin and other crypto currencies around the world, regulations governing them and basics of crypto currency mining and trading.
Large multinationals can reduce currency risk through "natural" hedges from having suppliers and customers in multiple countries and currencies. Their supply chains can be managed by either invoicing choices or sourcing differences so that currency fluctuations mostly offset each other.
Take the examples of Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan, when they floated their currencies that were previously pegged to the dollar amid low oil prices.
"Contrary to conventional wisdom, our research shows that fiat currencies crowd out Bitcoin, not the reverse, and that the design and size of the Bitcoin market deprives the currency of its intended use as a medium of exchange," KiHoon Hong said.
The logic here is that currencies over time tend to revert back to a mean and it is difficult in the short term to predict movements.
-the 1st Group: hard currencies that are widely used for settling international transactions, freely traded in the main global foreign exchange markets and qualify as eligible assets for investment purposes;
Tether's integration with Cryptsy allows its customers to transact with fiat currencies across the exchange and blockchain without the volatility concerns related to bitcoin or alt coins.