Rotation

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Rotation

An active asset management strategy that tactically overweighted and underweighted certain sectors, depending on expected performance. Sometimes called sector rotation.

Sector Rotation

An investment strategy in which a portfolio overweights or underweights certain sectors in accordance with expected performance. Sector rotation is a form of active investment management; the portfolio manager observes market trends and alters the composition of the portfolio in order to earn the highest possible return. Sector rotation is fairly high risk, as a portfolio's systematic overweighting and underweighting means that is not efficiently diversified. See also: Markowitz portfolio theory.
References in periodicals archive ?
To learn more about Hello Riot and how CURLS ON FLEEK can hydrate and define curly hair, please visit www.
Our Love Your Curls campaign is intended to inspire millions of women to feel confident about embracing their natural curls.
IT'S the age-old hair conundrum - women blessed with a head full of natural, tumbling curls want straight tresses, while those graced with poker-straight locks long for a bouncier bonce.
Remove curls from the boards and suspend the curl from the bound end in a vented area.
She says: Being small and compact the tongs are good for trips away and for creating small curls at the ends of the hair.
Curl includes Excel-like functions, such as automatic inputs using record grids and tabs, which greatly reduce keyboard input time.
Curl defenders may have to expand to the flat area.
The silicone in these serums coats the hair shaft and seals in moisture, preventing hair from shrinking up into all-over-the-place curls.
Back by popular demand, the new model offers the added benefit of a ceramic coated barrel for smooth, shiny curls and not only allows you to curl dry hair but also to blow dry and style towel-dried hair.
Curl is especially enjoyable on the subject of the various revivals of early nineteenth-century England, and among the various details now added is a reference to a favourite local curiosity of my own, the bizarre former synagogue in Canterbury--a miniature Egyptian temple in concrete not far from the cathedral precincts.