Cure

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Cure

To make good a default.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Cure

1. To correct an error.

2. To make a payment, either in full or in part, on a liability that is in default.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
In the 1930s, most curers were temporary workers from the southern US, as only these men were considered sufficiently skilled for the job.
The 18 curers' names are Beard, Becker, Budwig, Burzynski, Coley, Crile, Gerson, Glover, Hamer, Lakhovsky, Lincoln, Livingston, Michelakis, Naessens, Olney, Ott, Revici, and Rife.
(21) A Jewish settler of uncertain identity, from Maya curers, apparently collected the book in the early eighteenth century.
However, despite the quality of anthropological texts on healers, the majority of studies look at the subject through the eyes of the curers (29).
The demand for nanoscale products such as nanoscale computers, electronics, machines and nano based medical curers is rising across the globe, due to growing urbanization and change in consumer preferences.
Citing the "economic stagnation" of much of rural Newfoundland, he opines that "This state of affairs is closely tied to a general lack of good schooling and the resultant high rate of illiteracy." On this point I defer to O'Flaherty, who argues that higher literacy rates are less likely to have made people better catchers and curers of fish than to have facilitated their exit from the fishery and, owing to a paucity of alternative employment, their departure from the country.
"H.Forman & Son, as the UK's oldest salmon curers, are delighted to be submitting an application for protected status for its traditional and artisanal 'London Cure' smoked salmon.
For this purpose Paul particularly questions the hegemony of Psychiatry where the curers regard the sufferers as the representation of "world sickness".
(68) Kintz describes the young adolescent girl sitting next to her as "limp from the emotional impact" and notes how "the ceremony would define the humanity of the fetus for that twelve-year-old girl in a way that would never again have to be articulated; the 'fact' would be felt in terms of belief that fully engaged her body." (69) As with the men ventriloquizing for fetuses, the memorial service conducted by the CWA was a highly theatrical event, a symbolic reimag-ining of living and breathing (and in the ventriloquists' case speaking) babies that never were born (babies that are, by the way, always imagined to be future presidents or curers of cancer, but never imagined to be future Planned Parenthood workers).
(11.) Preserving herring suitable for export used sophisticated technology requiring support from numerous other frades such as coopers and curers. This technique was first pioneered by the Dutch.
Intracultural variation in folk medicinal knowledge: A comparison between curers and noncurers.
Dalrymple spoke of "the shrillness of opposing camps, of diagnosers, prognosticators, and curers" all with "diametrically opposed solutions, the only thing in common between them being the certainty with which they are offered." And he mocked the all-explanatory, unitary theories: "Each has a single simple principle....