cumulative

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Cumulative

A preferred stock where the publicly-traded company must pay all dividends. If a company misses a dividend payment for any reason, it still owes it to cumulative preferred stockholders. That is, all dividends that were "skipped" must be paid to cumulative preferred stockholders before any dividends are paid to common stock holders. This contrasts with non-cumulative preferred stock, where stockholders must forgo dividend payments that are missed. Most preferred stock is cumulative.

cumulative

Of or relating to preferred stock and income bonds on which dividends must be paid in full before any payment of dividends is made to common stockholders. Thus, any dividends that are passed eventually must be brought up to date before common stockholders may receive payments. Nearly all issues of preferred stock are cumulative. Compare noncumulative. See also dividends in arrears.
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, the cumulativeness of absorptive capacity and its nature of history dependence preclude SMEs from becoming responsive in a short period of time.
Findings about an important Arab society may be compared to findings from research in other world areas, thereby contributing to the quest for theoretical cumulativeness.
Thus, science does not fit the ideal image of cumulativeness conventionally ascribed to it.
It adopts the idea of cumulativeness inherent in Guttman's approach, and, in addition, the probabilistic nature of Mokken's model allows for nonperfect response patterns.
One, from `strategic' trade theory and `new economic geography', relies on scale economies, cumulativeness, and agglomeration externalities to explain the location of activity (Krugman, 1986, 1991; Venables, 1996).
As this volume demonstrates, cumulativeness also means that the scientific discussion becomes less dramatic but simultaneously more nuanced.
Growth Learning processes, tacit know-how, cumulativeness of technical improvements, modularity of technology investments, first-mover advantages, synergetic effects