cubic yard


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cubic yard

A measurement used to measure concrete,gravel,or earth. It measures 3 ft 3 ft 3 ft, which is equivalent to 27 cubic feet. Usually shortened to simply “yard,” as in “It will take 12 yards of dirt to fill that hole.”

References in periodicals archive ?
Using this number, the estimated cost savings to the producer will be in the range of $3, $8.50, $6.98, and $12.03 per cubic yard for the above four scenarios, respectively.
At about $2.50 per 2-cubic-foot bag, or $10 per cubic yard (6 cents per square foot for a 2-inch layer), it's most common in western Oregon and Washington.
To date, this program has resulted in a 61 percent recycling rate by weight, and the elimination of more than 8,000 cubic yards of construction waste from Wisconsin landfills in just 10 months.
For its 621B model wheel loader, Case suggests buckets in the range from two cubic yards to 2.75 cubic yards.
When the dust settled, the rubble totaled roughly 30,000 cubic yards of material, but it's what the contractors did with the debris that makes this project unique.
"The higher the volume we get," he adds, "the lower the price per cubic yard."
In 2014 approximately 575,000 cubic yards of PCB-contaminated sediment were dredged from the bottom of the river, exceeding the annual goal of 350,000 cubic yards.
The other five Southern Illinois landfills currently have a capacity of more than 86 million gate cubic yards and received just more than 1.7 million gate cubic yards of waste in 2013.
KOBELCO's SK17SR boasts a maximum digging depth of 7 feet 1 inch, a bucket digging force of 3,420 pounds and a bucket capacity of .058 cubic yards. Auxiliary hydraulics, pattern changers and a dozer blade are standard equipment with this model.
The present phase calls for putting 5.2 million cubic yards of waste into the existing footprint beginning in 2007, said David Murphy, vice president with town consultant Tighe & Bond, who agreed with Casella's projections.
Over 600 tons of steel, 2,800 cubic yards of concrete, 42,000 square feet of exterior metal panels and 14,000 square feet of glass were used in the construction of the building while the flight line has approximately 115,000 cubic yards of concrete with seven flight stalls serving as the working offices for flight service technicians before the delivery of the 787.
As much as 40,000 cubic yards of sand will be placed approximately one mile northward on a 1,300-foot length of Salisbury Beach, and up to 125,500 cubic yards of sand will be placed approximately one mile southward on a 2,500-foot section of Plum Island Beach in Newbury, Karalius said.