M3

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M3

Measure of the U.S. money stock that consists of M2, time deposits of $100,000 or more at all depository institutions, term repurchase agreements in amounts of $100,000 or more, certain term Eurodollars and balances in money market mutual funds restricted to institutional investor.

M3

A measure of money supply used by the various central banks. In the Federal Reserve System, M3 includes all physical currency and deposits in checking accounts, deposits in savings accounts, certificates of deposit, institutional money market accounts, repurchase agreements, and other large liquid assets that do not circulate very often. The European Central Bank defines M3 as the aggregation of currency in circulation, overnight deposits, all money market accounts, debt securities with maturities of up to two years, and repurchase agreements. M3 includes money that circulates very little or not at all and, therefore, the Federal Reserve no longer calculates M3 when determining the money supply. However, it is useful to some economists seeking to determine the entire amount of money in a given economy. See also: M0, M1, M2, M4

M3

A very broad measure of the domestic money supply that includes M2 items plus any large time deposits and money market fund balances held by institutions.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said Northen Collector tunnel will add another 140,000 cubic metres per day to the current Ndakaini installed capacity.
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* UAE-based trader Gulf Petrochem's 412,000 cubic metres of oil storage came online in mid-January 2013.
It could produce four million cubic metres of gas daily, the minister added.
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Dudzinski expects gas sales in the first quarter of 2010 at 300 million cubic metres more than originally planned because of the recent severe winter conditions.
This month has so far yielded 18.5 million cubic metres making this the best December in the past eight years in terms of water flow in the reservoirs.
Thika dam has a storage capacity of 70,000,000 cubic metres at full storage level of 2,041 metres above sea level and a depth average of 65m.
The deficit of fuel supplied to power plants this week decreased to 6m cubic metres of gas and equivalent as compared to 10m last week.
Up until now during the month of March the inflow rose to 26 million cubic metres, two million less than February's inflow.
Acting MD Nahashon Muguna yesterday said Thika dam's storage stood at 34 million cubic metres, representing 49 per cent of its full capacity.
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