crowd

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Crowd

1. Members of an exchange who congregate in a certain area on a trading floor to make transactions. Crowds especially trade in certain securities. For example, the active bond crowd may gather in one area of the floor while the cabinet crowd may gather in another.

2. Informal for most investors. People with different investment philosophies alternately advise to either follow or avoid following the crowd.

crowd

Members on the floor of an exchange who are clustered around a pit or a specialist's post waiting to execute trades. See also foreign crowd.
References in classic literature ?
Then the trumpet sounded, and the crowd became silent while the herald announced the terms of the contest.
These soldiers were, no doubt, the last comers of that crowd who, from the base of the hill of Studzianka to the fatal river, formed an ocean of heads intermingled with fires and huts,--a living sea, swayed by motions that were almost imperceptible, and giving forth a murmuring sound that rose at times to frightful outbursts.
I shall never forget the last glimpse which I had of the inn yard and its crowd of picturesque figures,all crossing themselves, as they stood round the wide archway, with its background of rich foliage of oleander and orange trees in green tubs clustered in the centre of the yard.
Sudden exclamations from the crowd caused him to spring to the window and look out.
The crowd round them was laughing too and indeed, how could they help laughing?
The procession took up the barkeeper and moved on with him again, and the crowd broke up and scattered.
The growing crowd, he said, was becoming a serious impediment to their excavations, especially the boys.
Dinah did not know that the crowd was silent, gazing at her with a sort of awe--she did not even know how near they were to the fatal spot, when the cart stopped, and she shrank appalled at a loud shout hideous to her ear, like a vast yell of demons.
Of course, the SUPREMELY aristocratic thing is to be entirely oblivious of the mire of rabble, with its setting; but sometimes a reverse course may be aristocratic to remark, to scan, and even to gape at, the mob (for preference, through a lorgnette), even as though one were taking the crowd and its squalor for a sort of raree show which had been organised specially for a gentleman's diversion.
The entire crowd now joined as if in one cry; all the cries united formed one immense howl.
He then seated himself at the foot of the ladder in the Arab fashion, with his legs crossed under him, and a portion of the crowd collected around him in a circle, at respectful distances.
It must be stated, in honor of the good sense of the loungers of Paris, that the greater part of this crowd directed their steps towards the bonfire, which was quite in season, or towards the mystery play, which was to be presented in the grand hall of the Palais de Justice (the courts of law), which was well roofed and walled; and that the curious left the poor, scantily flowered maypole to shiver all alone beneath the sky of January, in the cemetery of the Chapel of Braque.