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Cross

Securities transaction in which the same broker acts as agent for both sides of the trade; a legal practice only if the broker first offers the securities publicly at a price higher than the bid.

Cross

To match and execute two orders made to the same broker. Suppose a broker receives one order to buy 1,000 shares at $45 and another to sell 1,000 shares at $45. If he matches these two together, he is said to cross the orders. Crossing is subject to some regulation to prevent conflict of interest on the part of the broker.

cross

To match, by a single broker or dealer, a buy order and a sell order. For example, a floor broker may have an order to buy 500 shares of IBM at $120 and another order to sell 500 shares of IBM at the same price. Subject to certain rules, the floor broker may cross the order by matching the sell and the buy orders. Crossing of stock is common in large blocks.
References in periodicals archive ?
The tradition is alive, and the exhibit is not about crosses per se, but of the enduring and living devotion of Filipinos to the cross, he added.
A freedom march from north to south of the Baltics, the Freedom Trail as it is called, established independence once again, and with joy, Lithuanians converged on the Hill of Crosses in vindication of their faith.
Year by year, the Hill of Crosses has become an even more haunting and mystical place of pilgrimage with a pervading sense of serenity, of thankfulness and humility.
Note: The team getting in the most crosses did not always win the match.
They want us to take the crosses down, but how can they tell us what to do?
Tradition tells us that's how the three crosses in the old cistern were discovered, and Helena identified the "true cross" either deductively or by a miracle, depending on the source of the story.
Jewish leaders worldwide vigorously decried the presence of the crosses and pressed for Church and government intervention.
Peter, an upside-down Latin cross said to be the instrument of martyrdom requested by Peter because he thought himself unworthy to be executed the same way that Jesus was; (6) the Celtic cross, with a circle representing eternity; (7) the Maltese cross, with eight points representing the Beatitudes; (8) the Jerusalem or Crusader's cross, made up of four Greek crosses around four joined Taus, representing the five wounds of Christ, and evangelization to the four corners of the world; (9) the Eastern cross, one of the earliest, still used in Russian Orthodox and other eastern Churches; the upper bar represents the "INRI" inscription; (10) the Patriarchal cross, processional cross used by Patriarchs and Archbishops; (the Papal version has a third crossbar).
These additions and modifications also quietly testify to different gospel messages: the adorned bodiless crosses of the Byzantine world proclaim Christ overcoming death on the cross; the tortured medieval crucifixes are meant to move people to sorrow and repentance; the beautiful suffering Christs of the young Michelangelo or the mature Velazquez speak of the beautiful human dignity in death of the incarnate Christ.
Often symbolized by simple wooden crosses, a style that continues to adorn church walls and cloister gardens to this day, the stations are also represented by sculptures and paintings reflecting the artistic traditions of the medieval, Renaissance, and modern eras.