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critical

or

key success factors

the resources and capabilities/competencies/ skills a firm must possess to achieve some competitive ‘success’ and profitability in a market. For example, a pharmaceutical firm such as Glaxo Smith Kline must possess financial resources and skilled research staff to fund and develop expensive and innovative new drugs. However, this is not enough in itself to achieve a COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE over rival suppliers and deliver above-average profits; that is the firm must achieve greater differential competitive advantage by having superior resources and capabilities (technical, but crucially also managerial expertise) such as to create more value than its competitors. See VALUE CREATED MODEL, VALUE ADDED ANALYSIS, RESOURCE BASED THEORY OF THE FIRM, DISTINCTIVE COMPETENCIES.
References in periodicals archive ?
Film critic Osama Abdul Fatah asserted that the tribute to Ali Abu Shadi "aims at honouring him as a public figure, film critic, and statesman, and also honouring his entire generation that was born after the second world war and was raised in the 1960s."
Scott notes that critics are often wrong in their assessments and that is how it must be in a field based on intuition, judgment, and conjecture.
Graham Jones FOOD critics are sometimes controversial for the sake of it.
Where have the heavyweight professional critics Janet Maslin, Carrie Rickey, Caryn James, Leah Rozen, Eleanor Ringel, Lisa Schwarzbaum, Susan Wloszczyna, Claudia Puig, Christy Lemire, Lisa Kennedy and Katherine Monk gone, once they took the buyout or got shifted from their perch?
STILL, JONES RECOGNIZES THAT THE INDUSTRY is evolving and the role of the critic is expanding.
In a logical fashion, the authors provide a full discussion of the Inner Critic, detailing seven specific types of critics that people might have, including "The Perfectionist," who has "very high standards for behavior, performance, and production," and "The Guilt Tripper," who "constantly makes you feel bad and will never forgive you." The authors make the surprising point that the Inner Critic is "actually trying to help us" because it "thinks that pushing and judging you will protect you from hurt and pain." As a result, they advise the reader to form a "positive connection" with the Inner Critic and understand its motivation.
For a dozen years, until the fall of 2012, I was a critic at the Chicago Tribune.
* Mavis Taillieu, Infrastructure Transportation, Emergency Measures and Lotteries critic;
Tim Appelo, editorial director of Seattle's City Arts magazine and a former video critic at Entertainment Weekly (EW), who has written cultural criticism for the L.A.
Phillips and Scott replace Ben Lyons, a former film critic for the E!
Podhoretz isn't concerned over the supposed harm done to the "national cultural conversation" by the decline of salaried critics. That's because there are hundreds, maybe thousands, of nonprofessional critics reviewing feverishly on the Web.
Reda added: "The critic should be familiar with the history of cinema, and have a broad reference.