Cowboy

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Cowboy

A slang term for an employee who is hard to manage either because he/she does not work well with others, has a difficult personality, or for some other reason.
References in periodicals archive ?
If teams have to fly, they return on the same night, just like they would for a bus trip, explains Cowherd.
The legend of Weaving Maid and Cowherd was one of the favorite themes in Chinese poetry throughout the ages, and the story was usually treated to depict either the "frustrated longing" or the "brevity of [the] lovers' meeting.
Cowherd, Improved Emission Factors For Fugitive Dust From Western Surface Coal Mining Sources, 2 Volumes, EPA Contract No.
Weekday Programming Program ESPN Radio Anchor(s) "Mike and Mike in the Morning" Mike Greenberg, Mike Golic and Bob Picozzi "The Herd with Colin Cowherd" Colin Cowherd and Dan Davis "The Mike Tirico Show" Mike Tirico, Scott Van Pelt, Michelle Tafoya, Kirk Herbstreit, and Dan Davis "The Stephen A.
Cowherd, a nurse practitioner, opened a clinic to fill the need for rural health care in Richmond.
When Cadet Brandon Bodor was in Washington for the inauguration in January, he visited Arlington National Cemetery and the grave of Leonard Cowherd ('03), who was killed in Karbala.
It was described as "the call of a cowherd from Appenzell.
Located in Frankfort, KY, Cowherd is charged with overseeing approximately 100 employees, 32 facilities (almost 3 million square feet), and the delicate balance of tenant/landlord relationships.
But when her father promises to marry her off to the local cowherd she runs off in search of Camelot and meets Gawain, who she joins on his quest to find the Green Knight.
According to the legend that has inspired the imagination of Chinese for many centuries, a cowherd and a girl weaver meet on a galaxy-spanning bridge built with birds across the Milky Way on the seventh night of the seventh month of each lunar year.
The festival marks the joyous return of Lord Krishna to his home and devotees in the sacred cowherd village of Vrindavan, which he left for the city of Dwaraka to rule over the world.
The instrumentation, however, gives the musicians a much different color palette than the one used by Ellington: Melvin Butler on tenor and soprano saxophones; Jon Cowherd on keyboards; Dave Easley on pedal steel guitar; Christopher Thomas on bass; Myron Walden on alto saxophone and bass clarinet; and Brian Blade on drums, acoustic guitar, and voice.