Greed

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Related to covetousness: 7 Deadly Sins

Greed

The intense, perhaps inordinate, desire for wealth. There is no consensus as to how much desire qualifies as greed. Some believe greed to be positive as it motivates business, which spurs economic growth. Many others, however, believe greed can go too far and create unsustainable growth or growth at the expense of social justice. The morality of greed is a concern in the field of business ethics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of all forms of covetousness the worst is its "whited sepulchre" version (Matt.
In the spring of 1940 the Klemperers are made to rent out their house to a shopkeeper whose covetousness outweighs his good will.
The collapse of Soviet Communism can be read as a parable about what happens to a society that seeks to banish the sin of covetousness. Poorly informed critics, most of them foreigners or leftists, fail to notice that among American consumers the acts of getting and spending serve a spiritual, not a material, purpose.
The Commandments do not confine themselves to arguably secular matters, such as honoring one's parents, killing or murder, adultery, stealing, false witness and covetousness. Rather, the first part of the Commandments concerns the religious duties of believers: worshipping the Lord God alone, avoiding idolatry, not using the Lord's name in vain and observing the sabbath day.
The life lived by grasping, covetousness and self-serving puts us at odds with God and God's compassion for those who are poor.
Naturally, I will now spread out before you in the next sixty minutes the strange encounters and moments of covetousness of my childhood, for here you rightly suspect the basis for everything that I attempt to stir up with my novels.
This moralizing passage covers primarily the following issues: generosity, when it becomes a goal per se for the benefactor, often turns into covetousness and greed; in this situation the benefactor becomes very unscrupulous about the means by which he obtains the riches necessary for his assumed role; generosity should not exceed resources, for generosity that is based on harming other people (as a result of lack of means) cannot be called true generosity.
And whosoever is saved from his own covetousness, and then they are the successful ones.' [64:16]
The covetousness of China for resources [mirrors] ...
"But those who before them, had homes (in Madinah) and had adopted the faith show their affection to such as came to them for refuge, and entertain no desire in their hearts for things given to the (latter), but give them preference over themselves even though poverty was their (own lot) and those saved from the covetousness of their own souls -- they are the ones that achieve prosperity." (Surat Al-Hashr (Gathering).
He told priests: "Don't make children the object of your impure covetousness."
In this brief historical review we are not concerned with examining foreign covetousness in Lebanon.