bond

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Related to covalent bond: nonpolar covalent bond, Noncovalent bond

Bond

Bonds are debt and are issued for a period of more than one year. The US government, local governments, water districts, companies and many other types of institutions sell bonds. When an investor buys bonds, he or she is lending money. The seller of the bond agrees to repay the principal amount of the loan at a specified time. Interest-bearing bonds pay interest periodically.

Bond

A security representing the debt of the company or government issuing it. When a company or government issues a bond, it borrows money from the bondholders; it then uses the money to invest in its operations. In exchange, the bondholder receives the principal amount back on a maturity date stated in the indenture, which is the agreement governing a bond's terms. In addition, the bondholder usually has the right to receive coupons or payments on the bond's interest. Generally speaking, a bond is tradable though some, such as savings bonds, are not. The interest rates on Treasury securities are considered a benchmark for interest rates on other debt in the United States. The higher the interest rate on a bond is, the more risky it is likely to be.

There are several different kinds of bonds. The most basic division is the one between corporate bonds, which are issued by private companies, and government bonds such as Treasuries or municipal bonds. Other common types include callable bonds, which allow the issuer to repay the principal prior to maturity, depriving the bondholder of future coupons, and floating rate notes, which carry an interest rate that changes from time to time according to some benchmark. Along with cash and stocks, bonds are one of the basic types of assets.

bond

1. A long-term promissory note. Bonds vary widely in maturity, security, and type of issuer, although most are sold in $1,000 denominations or, if a municipal bond, $5,000 denominations.
2. A written obligation that makes a person or an institution responsible for the actions of another.

Bond.

Bonds are debt securities issued by corporations and governments.

Bonds are, in fact, loans that you and other investors make to the issuers in return for the promise of being paid interest, usually but not always at a fixed rate, over the loan term. The issuer also promises to repay the loan principal at maturity, on time and in full.

Because most bonds pay interest on a regular basis, they are also described as fixed-income investments. While the term bond is used generically to describe all debt securities, bonds are specifically long-term investments, with maturities longer than ten years.

bond

a FINANCIAL SECURITY issued by a company or by the government as a means of borrowing long-term funds. Bonds are, typically issued for a set number of years (often 10 years plus), being repayable on maturity. They are issued in units of a fixed (nominal) face value and bear a fixed (nominal) rate of interest. Purchasers of bonds include private individuals, commercial banks and institutional investors (pension funds, etc.) who hold them as a form of portfolio investment.

Once issued, bonds can be bought and sold on the STOCK MARKET. Bond prices tend to fluctuate at prices below their face value, reflecting buying and selling strengths, but are closely linked to prevailing market interest rates so as to remain attractive to potential buyers. For example, a £100 bond with a nominal 5% interest rate returning £5 per year would have to be priced at £50 if current market interest rates were 10% so that a buyer could earn an effective return of £5/£50 = 10% on his investment.

In addition to their role as a means of borrowing money, the sale and purchase of bonds is used by the monetary authorities to control the MONEY SUPPLY. See MONETARY POLICY. See also EUROCURRENCY MARKET, GILT-EDGED SECURITY.

bond

a FINANCIAL SECURITY issued by businesses and by the government as a means of BORROWING long-term funds. Bonds are typically issued for periods of several years; they are repayable on maturity and bear a fixed NOMINAL (COUPON) INTEREST RATE. Once a bond has been issued at its nominal value, then the market price at which it is sold subsequently will vary in order to keep the EFFECTIVE INTEREST RATE on the bond in line with current prevailing interest rates. For example, a £100 bond with a nominal 5% interest rate paying £5 per year would have to be priced at £50 if current market interest rates were 10%, so that a buyer could earn an effective return of £5/50 = 10% on his investment.

In addition to their role as a means of borrowing money, government bonds are used by the monetary authorities as a means of regulating the MONEY SUPPLY. For example, if the authorities wish to reduce the money supply, they can issue bonds to the general public, thereby reducing the liquidity of the banking system as customers draw cheques to pay for these bonds. See also OPEN MARKET OPERATION, BANK DEPOSIT CREATION, PUBLIC SECTOR BORROWING REQUIREMENT, SPECULATIVE DEMAND FOR MONEY, CONSOLS.

bond

A certificate that provides evidence of a debt or obligation.

Bond

A note obliging a corporation or governmental unit to repay, on a specified date, money loaned to it by the bondholder. The holder receives interest for the life of the bond. If a bond is backed by collateral, it is called a mortgage bond. If it is backed only by the good faith and credit rating of the issuing company, it is called a debenture.
References in periodicals archive ?
Actually on Au surface, not obtaining organometallic intermediates is a common phenomenon, and the generally accepted opinion is that the SSR are mobile, diffuse around on the surface of substrate, and form covalent bonds upon encounter.
As said before, atoms on different layers of MWNT are not connected by covalent bonds. The only interaction between them is through van der Waals forces, which can be either an attraction force or a repulsion force.
It also explains covalent bonds which are the foundation of organic chemistry as well as the "rule of two" according to which electrons are present in molecules in pairs with only a few exceptions, despite their mutual electric repulsion.
Furthermore, many of carbon's covalent bonds are with other carbon atoms, a process called catanation, producing the long and complex and highly active molecules of life.
The lowest [E.sub.ads] values for the Conf1 and Conf3 are attributed to the two covalent bonds formed between the glyphosate molecule and the [B.sub.12][N.sub.12] nanocluster, Fig.
by use of standard phosphoramidite chemistry (15,16), with a brominated deoxyuridine substituted for the thymidine (T) usually found in DNA; these photoactive residues participate in covalent bond formation.
When mechanical stress is applied to the material, the weaker covalent bond would fail promptly.
The only approved BTK inhibitor, ibrutinib, is irreversible and makes a covalent bond with the C481 residue of the targeted protein.
Specific covalent bond formation between the drug and target protease was demonstrated through use of mass spectrometry and also x-ray crystallography.
Key statement: A process for preparing a functionalized anionic polymerization initiator, the process comprising combining a functionalized styryl compound and an organolithium compound, where the functionalized styryl compound is defined by the formula where each [R.sup.1] is independently hydrogen or a hydrocarbyl group, [R.sup.2] is hydrogen or a hydrocarbyl group, [R.sup.3] is hydrogen or a hydrocarbyl group, each [R.sup.4] is independently hydrogen or a monovalent hydrocarbyl, [R.sup.5] is hydrogen or a hydrocarbyl group, where at least one of [R.sup.3] or [R.sup.5] is hydrocarbyl, [R.sup.6] is a covalent bond or a hydrocarbylene group, and A is a functional group.
The cross-linking structure in covalent bond induced a homogeneous dispersion of POSS in PMMA at molecular level which was verified by transparency and Si element of EDS analysis of hybrid materials.
and combinations thereof and an electrodepositable binder, the binder is comprised of resin(s) comprised of a phosphorous-containing group in which X is a hydrogen, a monovalent hydrocarbon or an oxygen atom having a single covalent bond to the phosphorous atom, and each oxygen atom has a covalent bond to a hydrogen atom, an alkyl group, an aryl group, an alkylaryl group, an arylalkyl group, or the resin or one of the resins, with the caveat that at least one oxygen atom has a covalent bond to the resin or one of the resins; a carboxylate group separated by from 2-4 carbons from an ester group; and a tridentate amine ligand.