court

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Related to courts: State courts

court

An organ of government belonging to the judicial department and charged with resolving disputes among parties.Courts generally have jurisdictional requirements providing that only certain disputes among described parties for certain amounts of money may be heard.If you file your grievance in the wrong court, you may be prejudiced when the case is dismissed for lack of jurisdiction and the time period during which to file in the proper court has expired.

References in classic literature ?
Would it have been desirable to have composed the court for the trial of impeachments, of persons wholly distinct from the other departments of the government?
Lippet, if you are retained for the prisoner,” interrupted Judge Temple, “instruct your client how to plead; if not, the court will assign him counsel.
Aroused from studying the indictment by this appeal, the attorney got up, and after a short dialogue with the hunter in a low voice, he informed the court that they were ready to proceed.
The executive chief, with six others, appointed, three by each of the legislative branches constitutes the Supreme Court of Appeals; he is joined with the legislative department in the appointment of the other judges.
All this time the Queen had never left off staring at the Hatter, and, just as the Dormouse crossed the court, she said to one of the officers of the court, `Bring me the list of the singers in the last concert
Here one of the guinea-pigs cheered, and was immediately suppressed by the officers of the court.
Monsieur Stangerson--looking many years older and almost unrecognisable--Larsan, Arthur Rance, with his face ruddy as ever, Daddy Jacques, Daddy Mathieu, who was brought into court handcuffed between two gendarmes, Madame Mathieu, in tears, the two Berniers, the two nurses, the steward, all the domestics of the chateau, the employe of the Paris Post Office, the railway employe from Epinay, some friends of Monsieur and Mademoiselle Stangerson, and all Monsieur Darzac's witnesses.
Fair wards of court have faded into mothers and grandmothers; a long procession of Chancellors has come in and gone out; the legion of bills in the suit have been transformed into mere bills of mortality; there are not three Jarndyces left upon the earth perhaps since old Tom Jarndyce in despair blew his brains out at a coffee-house in Chancery Lane; but Jarndyce and Jarndyce still drags its dreary length before the court, perennially hopeless.
And so they all went into the wood where the Nightingale was wont to sing, and half the Court went too.
The court was all bestrewn with herbs and sprinkled with vinegar, as a precaution against gaol air and gaol fever.
The coadjutor possessed, perhaps, as much wit as all those put together who were assembled at the court to laugh at him.
They were straightway invited to dinner at Court, and their intention of staying in the town being announced, the politest ladies of the whole town instantly called upon Mrs.