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court

An organ of government belonging to the judicial department and charged with resolving disputes among parties.Courts generally have jurisdictional requirements providing that only certain disputes among described parties for certain amounts of money may be heard.If you file your grievance in the wrong court, you may be prejudiced when the case is dismissed for lack of jurisdiction and the time period during which to file in the proper court has expired.

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References in periodicals archive ?
court-martial, nor any other commanding officer, shall censure,
to prescribe the punishments which a court-martial may impose within the
That court-martial was later adjourned until April 6, two days before a parliamentary general election in which Fonseka is a candidate.
While endemic racism in the Union army tainted the disciplinary process on other levels, the records reveal that officers on general court-martial panels wrestled with providing fair judicial process to black defendants while maintaining discipline so that African American soldiers received equal treatment and justice in cases involving capital-level crimes.
A special court-martial, with maximum punishment of confinement for a year, is less severe than a general court-martial, which handles the most serious offenses, but tougher than a summary court martial, where maximum punishment is 30 days confinement.
This has affected both the established court-martial system and military commissions (14)--an entirely distinct process from the court-martial system with which our Court deals.
Jenkins will be tried in a hearing of the general court-martial, the highest-level court among three kinds of courts-martial, Shima said.
Two other senior officers who were on duty are also expected to face court-martial later this year.
''What the Japanese culture doesn't understand (is) had this gone to a court-martial the rules of evidence are such that it more than likely would have resulted in an acquittal, and that would have further enraged the Japanese population,'' he said.
Instead, he was tried by court-martial in 1991 and sentenced to two years' imprisonment.
The news came on March 4--the day before Saragosa's court-martial was scheduled to begin.