court

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court

An organ of government belonging to the judicial department and charged with resolving disputes among parties.Courts generally have jurisdictional requirements providing that only certain disputes among described parties for certain amounts of money may be heard.If you file your grievance in the wrong court, you may be prejudiced when the case is dismissed for lack of jurisdiction and the time period during which to file in the proper court has expired.

References in periodicals archive ?
It is worth mentioning that accessory punishments, concept-wise, are neither applied nor decreed by the court of law as they ensue ope legis, that is by the power of law and not ope judicis that is by the power of the court of law.
The additional resources to prepare complete transcripts for a court of law of an operation which could last for many months if not years would be a significant financial and human resource burden.
He looked up at me, glaring with utter contempt, the likes of which I hope never again to have directed my way in a court of law, especially as a defendant.
Shanley's guilt has yet to be established in a court of law, but why bother with a trial?
In a court of law, a new judge would be assigned and the case would continue from where it left off.
Scientific theory is no more absolute than law, and although a judiciary more enlightened on science may be warranted, the idea of a science court is fraught with the same inconsistencies as a court of law.
This lawsuit will allow her to reclaim some of her self-esteem by vindicating the violation of her rights in a court of law," says ACLU attorney John Butler.
Now the burden of proof is more squarely in the IRS's lap, in a court of law.
Here again, Rosenberg insists that the cure for the inherited sicknesses of the past is not a court of law.
acquisition and my role in the transaction, with the expectation of being vindicated by a court of law.
For victims to get justice, elders should negotiate the return of stolen animals while police make sure killers are apprehended and charged in a court of law.
Unable to present a convincing defence in a court of law, they want to persuade their followers that they are victims of a judicial conspiracy.