agent

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Agent

A party appointed to act on behalf of a principal entity or person. In context of project financing, refers to the bank in charge of administering the project financing.

Agent

A person who acts on behalf of an organization or another person. Agents have a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interests of the principal. Common examples of agents include brokers and attorneys. See also: Agency theory, Agency problem, Agency costs.

agent

An individual or organization that acts on behalf of and is subject to the control of another party. For example, in executing an order to buy or sell a security, a broker is acting as a customer's agent.

Agent.

An agent is a person who acts on behalf of another person or institution in a transaction. For example, when you direct your stockbroker to buy or sell shares in your account, he or she is acting as your agent in the trade.

Agents work for either a set fee or a commission based on the size of the transaction and the type of product, or sometimes a combination of fee and commission.

Depending on the work a particular agent does, he or she may need to be certified, licensed, or registered by industry bodies or government regulators. For instance, insurance agents must be licensed in the state where they do business, and stockbrokers must pass licensing exams and be registered with NASD.

In a real estate transaction, a real estate agent represents the seller. That person may also be called a real estate broker or a Realtor if he or she is a member of the National Association of Realtors. A buyer may be represented by a buyer's agent.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the PRINCIPAL) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent generally has authority to act within broad limits in conducting business on behalf of his or her principal and has a basic duty to carry out the tasks involved with due skill and diligence.

An agent or broker acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding scale commission or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. A stockbroker, for example, acts on behalf of clients wishing to buy and sell financial securities; an estate agent acts as an intermediary between buyers and sellers of houses, offices, etc.; while an insurance broker negotiates insurance cover on behalf of clients with an insurance company. A recruitment agency performs the services of advertising for, interviewing and selecting employees on behalf of a company. In addition to the role of agents as market intermediaries, organizational theorists have paid particular attention to the internal relationship between the employees (‘agents’) and owners (‘principals’) of a company See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the principal) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent thus acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding-scale commission, brokerage or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY for discussion of ownership and control issues as they affect the running of companies. See ESTATE AGENT, INSURANCE BROKER, STOCKBROKER, DIVORCE OF OWNERSHIP FROM CONTROL.

agent

One who acts on behalf of a principal in an agency relationship. See agency for an extended discussion.

References in periodicals archive ?
Use of silane coupling agent improved the repair shear bond strength, Weigand et al and Maneenut et al also suggested the use of silane coupling agent or silane based adhesive when doing repair between composites of different matrix systems, however further research is required to confirm its performance in clinical studies.9,16
The silane coupling agent is applied to the inorganic substrate before the product to be adhered is applied.
The wood-PVC composite containing 30% wood was fabricated without coupling agent and tested accordingly.
For example, fibers treated with 50% (by fiber mass) of MTMS and IBTMS coupling agents had higher Si content.
An examination of the FESEM micrographs for samples without coupling agent revealed the debonding of MCC fiber (Figure 8a).
Mu, "Modification of Ti[O.sub.2] with titanate coupling agent and its impact on the crystallization behaviour of polybutylene terephthalate," Iranian Polymer Journal, vol.
From Figure 3, it can be seen that the tensile strength of rubber composite materials filled by different kinds of coupling agent modified sepiolite nanofibers are different obviously.
Silane coupling agents are used as modifiers, and the product obtained is the modified amorphous silica with better performance.
Table 2: The results of the antibacterial rate (%) of the coatings under different filling content of tetrapod-like, nano-ZnO or conventional ZnO (coupling agent pretreated) Sample number 1 2 (conventional 3 4 5 ZnO) Filling content 0 20 10 15 20 (vol.%) Colibacillus 16.54 52.13 52.91 75.13 80.12 Staphylococcus 13.45 42.97 40.69 70.91 76.61 aureus THE IR FUNCTION: Figure 6 shows the IR spectra of acrylic matrix resin, tetrapod-like nano-ZnO/acrylic composite coating, and tetrapod-like micro-ZnO/ acrylic composite coating.
The purpose of this experiment was to significantly reduce the processing time of an n-HMR coupling agent from 24 hours to less than 30 minutes by applying an infrared heating drying step.
The best evidence for silane-glass chemical bonding involves studies with presilanized glasses where it was shown, by both infrared and Raman spectroscopic studies, that chemical reactions occur between the surface silanols and silanol groups of the coupling agent. Presumably these reactions involve prior formation of hydrogen bonded intermediates that then eliminate [H.sub.2]O or C[H.sub.3]OH to form covalent Si-O-Si bonds to the glass surfaces (Fig.
The aim of this study was to compare the quality of a polymerized layer of silane coupling agent over the commercial (StickNET) and industrial woven E-glass fibers (Iqbal Sons, Karachi).