corporeal

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corporeal

Tangible real or personal property; things you can touch. Contrast with incorporeal property such as easements (a right to use, but not a right to, property) and goodwill.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Corporeality and the body are tools for establishing the initial contact, and body language and non-verbal language are the mechanisms for establishing contact.
In this regard, Angela Carter breaks down the ontological stability of corporeality in the novel by emphasising corporeal performativity and gender fluidity.
There is certainly more that could be done on the topic of corporeality; I feel that applying some of the concepts raised by the contributors to Farmer Giles of Ham, Smith of Wootton Major, and "Leaf by Niggle" would be particularly interesting.
Maria Elena Capitani (University of Parma) explored differing approaches to corporeality in Kane's Cleansed and Crimp's The Country.
An inclusive education of corporeality in respect of the cerebral functionality can make learning significant (Ausubel, 1965) because it entails the emotional involvement of the student, allowing the recovery of his/her previous knowledge related to the corporeal experience.
Fossils speak to and raise questions about human genealogy, inheritance, and modes of future and past survival, and thus they provoke thought to travel along the temporal cusp of geologic corporeality, crossing 'live' and 'dead' matter.
Again the analogy with biopolitics is revealing: "naked corporeality, like naked life, is only the obscure and impalpable bearer of guilt.
In his letter to the Romans (second reading), Paul acknowledged the struggle every believer faces daily: the struggle of choosing to follow Jesus in his openness to God's Spirit, or to follow a lesser path, which he described as being "in the flesh." The "way of the flesh" is not corporeality per se.
Morgan called "visible saints" Indeed, Separatists in old and new England perceived corporeality as both more important and less dangerous than previous studies have allowed, which Martha L.
Dufrenne detects a fundamental correlation between temporal self-awareness and corporeality. Temporal passivity 'in turn manifests corporeality' (143).
From the moment that the dancers began interpreting them gesturally--each in a highly individual, exploratory mode--I came to realize how these works, ostensibly about what is "out there," were inherently about corporeality. Below is the text of a dialogue we began over email in September 2009: