corporate raider

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Corporate Raider

A person or company that is offering or executing a hostile takeover by buying shares directly from shareholders. If a firm makes an offer to shareholders to acquire a publicly-traded company after the board of directors refuses, or if it bypasses the board completely, one refers to the acquiring firm as a corporate raider. Often, the corporate raider does not actually intend to take over the target company, but is simply trying to force the board of directors to repurchase shares at a premium to their market value. A corporate raider that accumulates more than 5% of a company's outstanding shares must register with the SEC. It is also known simply as a raider. See also: Greenmail, Premium raid.

corporate raider

See raider.

corporate raider

see ARBITRAGEUR.
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, activist shareholders and hedge fund icons such as Robert Monks and John Paulson began softening some of the corporate raiders' techniques, raising money from other investors and aiming not for full board control, but for minority board representation.
* The advent of LBOs and "corporate raiders," the often-criticized payment of "greenmail," etc.
I'd redouble my efforts to leverage my distribution network to attract every possible brand which fits my strategy and damn what "a bunch of foreign corporate raiders" may wish.
"Inception", a science fiction and psychological thriller about corporate raiders invading other people's dreams, was written, produced, and directed by Christopher Nolan.
It isn't only thebanks that needattention - it is the corporate raiders like Kraft.
It isn't only the banks that need attention - it is the corporate raiders like Kraft.
In the 1980s swashbuckling corporate raiders could strike terror or fury into any retailer's top executives and board of directors.
BPCOs chairman accused the Russian partners of reverting to the harsh methods used by RussiaCOs corporate raiders to consolidate assets in the late 1990s, a charge some of the Russian shareholders called offensive.
Private equity companies, which last year were responsible for one fifth of last year's pounds l,900bn-worth of mergers and acquisition, have come under the spotlight recently with unions condemning them as corporate raiders or asset-strippers, only interested in quick profits.
United's success has made it attractive for corporate raiders and asset-strippers.
And to give the German public a taste of how Anglo-Saxon corporate raiders operate in today's world of globalization, a group of foreign investors, led by Christopher Hohn, managing partner of The Children's Investment Fund (TCI), a British-based hedge fund owning 8 percent of Deutsche Borse, succeeded in ousting Werner Seifert as chief executive of Deutsche Borse and forcing its supervisory board chairman, Rolf Breuer, to resign at the end of this year.
Their reputation as "corporate raiders" spelled consternation in boardrooms across Britain and the US and in the 1980s the name Hanson was a byword for all that was go-getting in British business.

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