corpus

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Corpus

corpus

1. The principal of a bond. For example, securities dealers create zero-coupon Treasury receipts by purchasing a regular Treasury bond and separating the interest coupons from the corpus. See also coupon stripping.
2. The principal amount of an estate or trust.
References in periodicals archive ?
L'attenzione--e questo e un valore aggiunto dei volumi, e piU in generale del progetto di ricerca nella sua globalita--e sempre rivolta non solo alla ricerca di tipo acquisizionale, ma anche all'uso didattico dei due corpora, di cui i volumi riportano vari esempi: i dati disponibili, infatti, costituiscono un serbatoio di materiali a cui gli insegnanti di italiano L2 possono attingere, e sono anche il punto di partenza per creare test, esercizi e attivita didattiche.
For twenty-five years, he taught Spanish language and literature, bilingual lexicography, and the use of corpora at the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil).
Also the main part of national corpora has one principle of structuring that is crucial for cross-cultural studies (Corpora & Cross-linguistic Research, 1998).
The potential benefits of the use of language corpora in second language teaching and learning have been discussed by scholars such as Johns (1986, 1991), Sinclair (1991, 2003), McEnery and Wilson (1996), McEnery and Xiao (2011), Hunston (2007) or Boulton (2011), to name but a few, who, amongst other advantages, highlight their capacity to present learners with authentic materials and to offer plenty of genuine examples of a particular linguistic item in various contexts, thus facilitating its understanding through such contexts.
For example, plain corpora are raw collection of text while annotated corpora associate the mark-up information with plain texts.
The corpora of understudied and under-resourced languages usually have documentary-linguistic nature, since they are commonly "based on audio and video recordings that are transcribed, annotated, and described with metadata by either a single researcher working in the field or by a small team of researchers" (Gries and Berez 2015: 2).
As Web corpus acquisition is much less controlled than that for traditional corpora, the necessity of analysing their content gains in significance.
Smith's analysis usefully demonstrates that corpora such as CMSW can be examined for information on historical pragmatics.
This same notion is also suggested by the ratio of 1-4 letter words which reveals a relatively small difference in both corpora (56% for ERAC and 58% for BNC).
Michael Handford's contribution, "Professional Communication and Corpus Linguistics", opens the first section of the volume, devoted to the relationship between corpora and institutional language use, and shows how corpora can contribute to pedagogy and training research in professional contexts.
The king of corpora is Mark Davies, a professor of linguistics at Brigham Young University (BYU).