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Copyright

The right to distribute, copy, or change an original work for a limited period of time. A state grants copyright to the creator of the work, but the creator may assign or sell the right. During the time the copyright persists, one must (with some exceptions) receive permission from the owner to publish or distribute the copyrighted material. After a certain period of time, any person may distribute the work without permission. See also: Public domain.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

copyright

the legal ownership by persons or businesses of certain kinds of material, in particular original literary, dramatic, musical and artistic work; sound recordings, films, broadcasts and cable programmes; the typographical arrangement or layout of a published edition; and computer programs. In the UK, the COPYRIGHT, DESIGNS AND PATENTS ACT 1988 gives legal rights to the creators of copyright material so that they can control the various ways in which their work may be exploited. Copyright protection is automatic and there is no registration or other formality The 1988 Act gives copyright owners protection against unauthorized copying of such material in most cases for a period of 50 years. If copyright is infringed, the copyright owner (or assignee or licensee) may seek an injunction through the courts preventing further abuses, with offenders liable to pay unlimited damages/ fines and prison sentences in extreme cases. See BRAND.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

copyright

the ownership of the rights to a publication of a book, manual, newspaper, etc., giving legal entitlement and powers of redress against theft and unauthorized publication or copying. See INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005

Copyright

The exclusive legal right to sell, reproduce, or publish a literary, musical, or artistic work.
Copyright © 2008 H&R Block. All Rights Reserved. Reproduced with permission from H&R Block Glossary
References in periodicals archive ?
With respect to copyright infringement, the defense argued that while an entire work can be copyrighted, characters within it cannot.
It is never more clear/unclear than when determining how much one can reproduce from a copyrighted work before being considered in violation of copyright law.
If the transfer of a computer program does not entail the transfer of any of the above rights, it is deemed a transfer of a "copyrighted article." This is normally the case when the seller grants a "license" for the nonexclusive use of a standardized product to an end-user.
Fair use also applies to making copies of copyrighted works, making derivative works (e.g., digitizing slides), distributing works (including electronic distribution), and displaying and performing works publicly.
Hernandez said there were three types of licenses that politicians using copyrighted music should secure.
With this, corporate-authored works such as Mickey Mouse were copyrighted for 95 years from their original date of publication, and works under non-corporate authorship were copyrighted for the life of the author plus 70 years.
sometimes copyrighted and sometimes utility-patented, (155) and
(35) Although the defendant exclusively used entirely copyrighted posters in its book, the court held that the fair use defense was applicable for a several reasons, including that the defendant reduced the posters' sizes in the book and that the posters were biographical in nature, causing the plaintiff to suffer no market harm.
For example, American copyright case law requires at least a modicum of creativity before a work-product can be copyrighted. (116) Conversely, following the Nordic Catalogue Rule, European and Japanese copyright statutes protect non-creative, brute-force cataloging and database compilations of facts (and other non-copyrightable elements) that require immense effort and presumably would not have been created but for the copyright incentive.
According to the plaintiffs, the law's so-called "safe harbour" provision for hosting sites didn't apply to music copyrighted before 1972.
In its post-2002 copyright jurisprudence, the Supreme Court of Canada has clarified that the Copyright Act grants a significant degree of latitude to non-copyright owning parties to express themselves using copyrighted works.
Hughes thus concluded that "courts and legislatures had regularly discussed copyrighted works as 'property' throughout the seventeenth, eighteenth, and early nineteenth centuries." (15)