COP

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COP

The ISO 4217 currency code for Colombian Peso.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

COP

1. ISO 4217 code for the Colombian peso. Instituted in 1837, it was pegged to the U.S. dollar for a time. Since 1955, however, the peso has floated. It has gradually deteriorated in value since.

2. Certificate of Participation. An investment in which the investor purchases the right to a share of a municipality's or government entity's lease revenues instead of a bond secured by those revenues. Government entities issue COPs to avoid limitations on debt legally placed upon them. This is roughly a government entity's equivalent to accounts receivable financing. In the United States, the organizations issuing or guaranteeing COPs are Ginnie Mae, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and Sallie Mae. They are also called participation certificates or PCs. See also: Lease revenue bond.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

COP

Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The questionnaire is designed to measure behavioral and cognitive coping types used during a potentially stressful event (Folkman & Lazarus, 1988).
* Confrontive coping: Aggressive efforts to alter situation.
While there are a variety of approaches to study coping, individual differences in coping stability-variability have been recognized as important factors in coping effectiveness and adaptational outcomes in stressful encounters (Oreg & Berson, 2015; Ptacek & Gross, 1997; Shaheen, Jahan, & Shaheen, 2014).
The dispositional paradigm of coping primarily concerns coping as an individual difference variable.
(age, gender, qualification and relationship status), brief coping scale was used.
It was designed by Charles Carver 1997 and translated into Urdu by Akhtar in 2005, consisting of 28 items including four sub scales i.e., Active Avoidance Coping, Problem Focused Coping, Positive Coping, Religious/Denial Coping.
Although research does suggest that women college students tend to report more appraised stress (e.g., ACHA, 2018; Brougham et al., 2009; Pierceall & Keim, 2007; Soderstrom, Dolbier, Leiferman, & Steinhardt, 2000), the coping literature is much less clear regarding gender differences.
The stress literature reveals several conflicting outcomes, and gender differences in the use of coping strategies have not been consistently demonstrated (for a review, see Tamres, Janicki, & Helgeson, 2002).
An abundance of definitions and explanations of coping exist within the scientific literature.
While several empirical studies have provided support for the transactional model of coping in relation to various stressors (e.g., Anshel, 1996; Anshel, Raviv & Jamieson, 2001; Poczwardowski & Conroy, 2002), considering that individuals and athletes can use consistent patterns of coping to deal with stressful situations (Crocker & Isaac, 1997; Panayiotou, Kokkinos & Kapsou, 2014), it is perceived that there may also be merit in measuring trait coping when considering what influences outcomes following elite soccer deselection.
The present study was designed to continue bridging the gap between psychological help-seeking and coping research by examining college students' help-seeking attitudes and intentions in the context of the various coping strategies they use.
Reflective coping was found to be a health-promoting coping style predicting a low level of depression and anxiety among international medical students.