Conversion

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Conversion

In the context of securities, refers to the exchange of a convertible security such as a bond into stock.

In the context of mutual funds, refers to the free exchange of mutual fund shares from one fund to another in a single family.

Conversion

The act of exchanging a convertible security for the underlying common stock. For example, if one holds a convertible bond in company A, conversion occurs when the holder gives the convertible bond back to company A and, in return, either receives for free or buys at a stated price, common shares in the same company.

conversion

(1) The process of changing a property into condominium ownership. (2) Wrongfully taking property of another,or denying that person access to his or her property.If a self-storage facility overlocks a tenant unit in the mistaken belief the rent is past due, when in reality the rent was credited to the wrong person's account,then the facility is guilty of conversion.

References in periodicals archive ?
Returning to the subject of the Pimonenko painting, which linked conversionary violence and Jewish fanaticism, we see it both as symptom and as cause of the decline of the Russian Empire's multiconfessional establishment and its tolerant ethos in the late imperial period.
FCBC experienced a catastrophic church split when about sixty members, mostly new arrivals from Hong Kong, left to plant another church "specifically to reach new immigrants." (94) As one evangelical separatist church member put it at the time, the church "broke" because the theology was "mah-mah" ("so-so"), indicating in Cantonese that the new evangelicals thought the social gospel's conversionary doctrine left much to be desired by Protestants emphasizing an individual experience.
Even (or perhaps especially) that most influential account of Christian introspection and conversion, Augustine's Confessions, treats the conversionary movement in an extremely complicated temporal fashion.
Levenson, Allan, 1995, The Conversionary Impulse in fin de Siecle Germany, Year Book XL, New York: Leo Baeck Institute.
I suggest that Christian International Non-Government Organizations (INGOs) that seek to promote the common good encounter the temptation to pursue this objective through strategies that are primarily either conversionary or lacking a supernatural emphasis.
She describes her project as one of looking at the "wider contexts" in which Henrietta Maria's cultural productions are situated, especially with respect to Henrietta Maria's "conversionary mission" in the English court, a role shaped by the early French cultural influences of her upbringing and her mother's--Maria de Medici's--powerful presence.
Those anti-Semitic Marian miracles that feature in the cycles of mystery plays relaying salvation history to late medieval audiences are conversionary in nature--the offender is healed upon repentance and acceptance of the truth of Christianity.
A conversionary experience conceivably could bifurcate a life in this way.
At least three different contributors, for example, discuss the famous conversionary conversation on the "true myth" of Christianity that took place in Oxford in 1931 between Lewis, Tolkien, and Hugo Dyson; however, each offers different details, none the complete picture.
However, when we do events with other Christians, we are highly conversionary. One of our main missions is to preach the Christian Zionist gospel to Christians across America."
The very act of reading has the power to induce a kind of conversionary experience and contributes directly to the shaping of new authorial identities.
Here Freinkel breaks through truisms concerning Portia's legalism or Venetian cynicism to grasp the theological integrity of Portia's performance, without relinquishing any ethical ground to the conversionary forces that Portia mobilizes in the name of mercy.