contributory negligence


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Related to contributory negligence: comparative negligence

contributory negligence

A legal theory of negligence followed in some states (often called “contrib.” for short). Under this theory, if someone was guilty of negligence that caused injury to another person, but the injured person was also negligent in any manner at all that contributed to his or her injuries,then there will be no recovery.

Example: If a contractor built a deck with supports in the soil instead of in concrete, the contractor would be guilty of negligence. If the homeowner routinely left a hose dripping at the base of one of the supports, leaching out the soil and rotting the wood, the homeowner would also be guilty of negligence. If the deck collapsed, then in a contributory negligence state the home- owner would not be allowed to recover any damages at all from the contractor. In a comparative negligence state, the homeowner's recovery would be reduced, but not eliminated.

References in periodicals archive ?
First, we examine whether it is possible to apply the same standard of care and the same process of reasoning when adjudging reasonableness in the context of negligence and contributory negligence, respectively (Part III).
Joint tortfeasors remained jointly and severally liable for all a plaintiff's indivisible damages minus the offset for contributory negligence. The new law merely permitted defendants to force a sharing of the judgment among themselves in equal pro-rata shares.
It is because, for example, comparative negligence is a discrete and discontinuous break from the evolutionary path of contributory negligence, that legislation is appropriate.
The varying schemes of comparative negligence have their roots in the English common law doctrine of contributory negligence. (62) The King's Bench in England formulated the doctrine in the (1809) case of Butterfield v.
(20) It did so primarily by emphasizing the proximate cause requirement for a plaintiff's actions to effectively preclude recovery under the doctrine of contributory negligence. (21) In Union Pacific Railway Co.
California Supreme Court abandoned contributory negligence in favor of
When contributory negligence dominated the legal landscape, courts attempted to ameliorate the all-or-nothing nature of this legal doctrine.
The topics discussed include the choice between liability rules, the existence and scope of the contributory negligence defense, the option of entrusting the administration claims to public or private insurance agencies, and the choice between a judicial or amicable mechanism of dispute of resolution.
"We were ready for a court battle and to show that there was a contributory negligence on the part of the parents," he said.
In legal terms, all cyclists should note that if they are involved in an accident, contributory negligence (meaning that an accident victim could be partly at fault for their injury) is increasingly being taken into consideration by insurance firms and judges if a cyclist was riding without a helmet when the accident occurred.
The defense raised legal arguments of contributory negligence, assumption of risk, and intervening cause, but was unsuccessful.
The court held, inter alia, that the Circuit Court did not abuse its discretion in granting the plaintiff a new trial on her postrial motion when the court determined that it erred in instructing the jury on contributory negligence and the jury found Northwestern liable in the suicide of the plaintiff's decedent, and the record evidence supported the court's ailing that the plaintiff s decedent was completely devoid of reason at the time of her suicide.